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Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB SSD Review
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Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB SSD
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by Robert Tanner on February 20, 2013 in Solid-State Drives

It’s the attack of the SandForce clones! Can any heroic atomic-powered SSD come to save us? Does Corsair’s Neutron have what it takes to rescue our PC in distress? Will the hordes of the positively-charged solid-state armies be neutralized in time? Tune in this week (or now) to find out!

Real-World: Batch Tests

Real-world results are surprisingly hard to come by when testing SSDs. It is extremely easy to showcase just how much faster any SSD on the market is compared to even a modern mechanical disk drive. However, when we try to compare SSD to SSD, differences can amount to just a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, often well inside the margin of error (and human reflexes), making any results obtained meaningless.

We are always eager to hear about any demanding storage workloads our readers may have, but in an effort to get around this problem, we have put together three batch test files that target three levels of intensity.

Firstly we have our light batch file, which we drop into the Windows Startup folder. Windows 7 will execute and load various programs and commands as it boots, making it perhaps the most easily pertinent of our three tests. Almost everyone has an array of programs that starts with their OS, ranging from background applications like anti-virus to programs like a browser or music player.

This batch file will load four websites in Firefox, start Photoshop CS5 and load five 5MB or greater images, and load 15MB of data in Word, Excel, and Powerpoint documents. Several background utilities will also load; a PDF file and compressed file are opened for viewing, and of course, since nobody likes to work without listening to some music, we have our favorite 56MB FLAC file playing the entire time. Obviously, all of this takes place while Windows 7 itself is still loading. We start timing from the moment the machine is powered on to the moment the last program finishes loading – and it isn’t as long as you might think. (We provide raw cold boot times on the next page for direct comparison).

Our medium batch test is similar although we apply the use of timers to space apart the commands. Instead of booting, time begins from the moment we execute the batch file until the moment all tasks have completed. The medium test also consists of the following:

  • Playback of a 56MB FLAC music file in Winamp
  • 50 ~8MB JPEGs queued to open in Photoshop CS5 64-bit
  • Launching of Adobe Lightroom
  • Opening of three Excel, three Word, and one PowerPoint files (various large sizes; for example one Excel file consists of a 72MB database)
  • Browsing to four different websites in Firefox
  • Copy of a 4.5GB file to a separate location on the same drive
  • Viewing of two PDF documents & compressed archives
  • Execution of multiple small system utilities

To keep things simple, the heavy batch test is identical to the medium test in all respects, save for one important addition. Computer users coming from HDDs will be familiar with the slowdown or even molasses-like feeling that occurs from having an anti-virus or anti-malware scan running in the background. SSDs scoff at this sort of thing however, and the typical SSD user wouldn’t think twice about running an anti-virus scan at the same time as playing a fullscreen game since framerates will remain relatively unaffected.

The heavy test will capitalize on this by running an anti-virus scan from Microsoft Security Essentials on a static, unchanging 5.1GB test folder that contains 19,748 files and 2,414 sub-folders copied from the Program Files directory. Also worth noting is that because the medium and heavy batch tests are identical save for the AV scan, results between them are directly comparable.

Light batch results are fairly mixed, but for the medium batch time the Neutron is able to tie its rival competitor. It is only after moving to the demanding heavy batch test that we can see what the difference those high queue depth optimizations make, with the Neutron giving up some ground here. Even so, it is still 20 seconds quicker than the aging m4, with the results pacing the V4. As we saw in Iometer, the LM87800 controller is optimized best with lower queue depth workloads that are typical of any desktop or laptop, and that explains the stark difference between the stellar medium batch times and the demanding heavy batch times.


  • http://techgage.com/ Marfig

    I must agree that 240GB at 200 USD and 5 year warranty, makes this the very first SSD I would consider buying.

    240GB would allow me to fit the OS, plus development environment and quite a few related essentials, that would allow me to keep a full programming environment under SSD speeds.

    • http://www.facebook.com/deathspawner Rob Williams

      I also have to agree. The 5-year warranty on such an affordable drive is -extremely- impressive, and an -extremely- bold move by Corsair given that LAMD controllers are not exactly “proven” in the enthusiast market yet. This would definitely be on the top of my list if I needed a new SSD.

    • Kougar

      For LAMD’s first entry into the enthusiast market, their roots in the enterprise space are clearly showing with how well its first consumer-oriented controller performs.

      The pricing, warranty, and performance is just the perfect combination with this drive. It easily outperforms all the SandForce clones in its price point yet the five year warranty proves Corsair is confident about, and committed to big things with this SSD and controller over the long run.

  • http://techgage.com/ Marfig

    BTW, I must say this:

    Techgage comes with some of the most comprehensive and well done tests I’ve come across on the web, beating in my opinion most of the established tech websites out there, both in scope and presentation. The amount of information is also phenomenal, providing the tests with the necessary backup info to put the data in context.

    This article, the NVIDIA’s Titan, the Seagate Constellation, to speak only of the most recent, are a sheer pleasure to read and should constitute a reference card to any geek or tech guru out there!

    And let’s not even speak of feature articles like Brett’s recent SSD’s at the office, or the absolute pearl that was his in depth introduction to pentesting, or Ryan Perry and Greg King’s case reviews!

    Frankly I’ll make sure TG is more often linked out there on the tubes.

    • http://www.facebook.com/deathspawner Rob Williams

      If only we could possess all of the others as successfully as we have you! Buahahaha. No, I kid. That’s what we’ve always strived for. We’re far from perfect but can at least do our best.

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