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Crucial Ballistix 1GB Kit PC4000
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by Rob Williams on July 11, 2005 in Memory

In the world of fast performance memory, Crucial sometimes get’s overlooked. We are taking a look at their PC4000 Ballistix, which we hope will prove overclocker friendly, as were the PC3200’s. Let’s check them out!

Introduction

Last month, we took a look at the Ballistix PC3200 512MB * 2 kit. Those modules proved easily overclockable, even to DDR540 (270MHz) speeds. Not only were they stable, they may have still had more pushing power, if it had not of been my CPU bottlenecking it.

We are now going to take a look at some PC4000 modules, to see how they stack up against the PC3200. I’m very interested to see if they overclock as well as the previous modules, which could mean some insane speeds. Firstly, some Crucial and Ballistix backstory.

About Crucial

The Crucial story starts with Micron Technology, Inc., one of the largest dynamic random access memory (DRAM) manufacturers in the world and the only one based in the U.S. Headquartered in Boise, Idaho, Micron manufactures DRAM chips and assembles them into high-quality memory modules for sale to original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) worldwide.

In 1996, Micron responded to a growing demand for high-quality memory upgrades among end users who wanted the best possible performance from their systems. Micron launched Crucial Technology in November of that year, and for the first time, end users had the opportunity to buy directly from the manufacturer the same memory modules bought by the world’s major OEMs for original installation in their systems.

About Ballistix

The Ballistix line is specifically built for performance enthusiasts who want to push the performance envelope without worrying about data loss or corruption, mysterious intermittent errors and display problems, or worse — the dreaded BSOD! The Ballistix line of high-performance memory modules features advanced speed grades, low latencies, and integrated aluminum heat spreaders.



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