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Danger Den TDX Block, MAG Pump, DD MAG II and Maze 4 GPU Block
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by Greg King on August 3, 2006 in Water-Cooling

Are you looking to delve into the world of water cooling, but don’t know where to start? Danger Den has sent us a slew of products to get our rig up and running, including the new AMD TDX block. Since this is also my first high-end water cooling rig, I relay my experiences to you.

Installation Cont., Results


The loop setup goes like this:

Pump > CPU > Radiator > GPU > Reservoir > Pump

I know that I could have put the radiator before the CPU but as it is now, the CPU stays plenty cool and the GPU is incredibly cool compared to it stock temperature on air of approximately 45°C.

Results

The results were impressive to say the least. The temperatures were taken while the CPU was at idle speeds and again when it was maxed out. To max out the dual cores, I ran CPU burn-in and a 32M Pi calculation. This was more than enough to keep the CPU at 100% load.

On air, my 4600+ idled around 33° and 43°under load. While overclocked, the air cooling idled around 35° and when loaded, was at 44°. Now these are not bad numbers for a stock heatsink but on water, the temps dropped even more.

Here is a screen shot of the temps at idle and then again at load when running at stock speeds:

And again at load

As you can see, the drop in temperature is impressive. I am really stoked about the temp of the GPU. It has always been a hot core, but with water, it does a lot better.

Now for some results with the CPU overclocked to 2.75 GHz

And again, overclocked

Once again, pretty impressive.

How about we see those results in a graph! Certainly!

The results speak for themselves. There was a full 4 degrees separating the air and water stock temps and when you get into load temps, the difference is even larger.


Page List:
Top

1. Introduction
2. GPU Block, Radiator
3. Reservoir
4. MAG II, Installation
5. Installation Cont., Results
6. Conclusion