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Gigabyte GeForce GTX 260 Super Overclock
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by Rob Williams on October 6, 2009 in NVIDIA-Based GPU

NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 260 is not a new card. In fact, it’s been available for over a year in its 216 Core form. So is it even worth a look at today? Where Gigabyte’s “Super Overclock” version is concerned, yes. Although it costs less than a stock GTX 275, this new card beat it out in almost every single game and setting we put it through.

Race Driver: GRID

If you primarily play games on a console, your choices for quality racing games are plenty. On the PC, that’s not so much the case. While there are a good number, there aren’t enough for a given type of racing game, from sim, to arcade. So when Race Driver: GRID first saw its release, many gamers were excited, and for good reason. It’s not a sim in the truest sense of the word, but it’s certainly not arcade, either. It’s somewhere in between.

The game happens to be great fun, though, and similar to console games like Project Gotham Racing, you need a lot of skill to succeed at the game’s default difficulty level. And like most great racing games, GRID happens to look absolutely stellar, and each of the game’s locations look very similar to their real-world counterparts. All in all, no racing fan should ignore this one.

Manual Run-through: For our testing here, we choose the city where both Snoop Dogg and Sublime hit their fame, the LBC, also known as Long Beach City. We choose this level because it’s not overly difficult, and also because it’s simply nice to look at. Our run consists of an entire 2-lap race, with the cars behind us for almost the entire race.

GRID is the first game in our line-up where the GTX 275 managed to pull ahead in performance – except at 2560×1600, where the Super Overclock regained its crown. ATI’s HD 4890, costing roughly the same as the Super Overclock, put both cards to shame, however.

Graphics Card
Best Playable
Min FPS
Avg. FPS
NVIDIA GTX 295 1792MB (Reference)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
82
101.690
ATI HD 4890 1GB (Sapphire)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
57
70.797
NVIDIA GTX 285 1GB (EVGA)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
54
66.042
NVIDIA GTX 260 896MB (Reference)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
47
63.897
NVIDIA GTX 275 896MB (Reference)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
52
63.617
ATI HD 4870 1GB (Reference)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
51
63.412
NVIDIA GTX 260 896MB (XFX)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
45
54.809
NVIDIA GTX 250 1GB (EVGA)
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
35
43.663
ATI HD 4770 512MB (Gigabyte)
1920×1080 – Max Detail, 4xAA
55
69.403

If the GTX 275 could talk, it would no doubt whine that the GTX 260 Super Overclock managed to beat it out by a meager 0.28 FPS at 2560×1600, but it is what it is. As long as you have a decent GPU, max detail settings are fine in this game, and the Super Overclock is no exception… it runs flawlessly at 2560×1600.


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