Latest News Posts

Social
Latest Forum Posts

Move Aside, GTX 680: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 Review
Bookmark and Share

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770
Print
by Rob Williams on May 30, 2013 in NVIDIA-Based GPU

Though it might seem a bit unusual to see NVIDIA let loose its GTX 770 a mere week after its 780 launch, here’s something to clear things up: $399. Built on GK104 (not GK110, like the 780), the GTX 770 is in effect a beefed-up GTX 680. It boasts 700 series features, NVIDIA’s latest cooler, and of course, a savings of about $100.

Temperatures & Power

To test graphics cards for both their power consumption and temperature at load, we utilize a couple of different tools. On the hardware side, we use a trusty Kill-a-Watt power monitor which our GPU testing machine plugs directly into. For software, we use Futuremark’s 3DMark 11 to stress-test the card, and techPowerUp’s GPU-Z to monitor and record the temperatures.

To test, the general area around the chassis is checked with a temperature gun, with the average temperature recorded (and thus noted in brackets next to the card name in the first graph below). Once that’s established, the PC is turned on and left to site idle for five minutes. At this point, GPU-Z is opened along with 3DMark 11. We then kick-off an Extreme run of 3DMark and immediately begin monitoring the Kill-a-Watt for the peak wattage reached. We only monitor the Kill-a-Watt during the first two tests, as we found that’s where the peak is always attained.

Note: (xx.x°C) refers to ambient temperature in our charts.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 - Temperatures

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 - Power Consumption

As with the GTX 780 and TITAN, the GTX 770 utilizes GPU Boost 2.0 to limit its temperature to 80°C, which we can see in the chart above. While the GTX 770 did idle at 2 degrees warmer than the GTX 780, it’s likely attributed only to the 1.4°C increase in ambient room temperature.

In the intro, we talked about the GTX 770’s TDP being 35W higher than the GTX 680. In real-world testing, the increase we exhibited was much less, just 16W.


Advertisement