NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Review: A Look At 4K & Ultrawide Gaming

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti - Angled
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by Rob Williams on March 9, 2017 in Graphics & Displays

If you want to dial your gaming to 11, the ideal GPU has just landed: GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. This card might sport an odd-sized 11GB framebuffer, and memory bandwidth of 11Gbps, but what ultimately matters is that it becomes the most suitable 4K gaming card to date (and not to mention, an amazing ultrawide card.)

DirectX 12: Ashes Of The Singularity, Hitman & Rise Of The Tomb Raider

DirectX 12 Testing

Considering the fact that we’ve been hearing about DirectX 12 for what feels like forever, it’s a little surprising that the number of DX12 titles out there remain relatively few – although the situation is improving at a faster rate than a year ago. In our next GPU suite overhaul (due next month), we’ll be evaluating more DX12 titles to include.

Of all the DirectX 12 games out there, Ashes of the Singularity takes some of the best advantage of its low-level API capabilities. As a strategy game, there could be an enormous number of AI bots on the screen at once, and in those cases, both the CPU and GPU can be used for computation.

I should be clear about one thing: low-level graphics APIs are designed to benefit low-end hardware better, but when we’re dealing with GPUs that cost over $500, that rules that kind of test useless. For that reason, I’ve chosen to benchmark these three games as normal; the results might not be specific to low-level DX12 enhancements, but they’re still fair for comparisons against other high-end graphics cards.

Ashes of the Singularity
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 - Ashes Of The Singularity (DirectX 12)
Rise of the Tomb Raider
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 - Rise Of The Tomb Raider (DirectX 12)
Hitman (2016)
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 - Hitman (DirectX 12)

These results back up most of our others: the GTX 1080 Ti doesn’t just reign supreme, it even leaps well beyond the GTX 1080 – NVIDIA’s flagship up until this point.