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The $109 Console-killer GPU: AMD’s Radeon R7 260 Graphics Card Reviewed
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AMD Radeon R7 260
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by Rob Williams on December 23, 2013 in AMD-Based GPU

No one should be surprised at the fact that testing out $500 graphics cards is fun, but with the right perspective, budget cards can be, too. Take the $109 AMD Radeon R7 260, for example, which has debuted following flagship console releases. With that in mind, let’s see what such an affordable GPU can pull off at the much-loved 1080p resolution.

Game Tests: Metro Last Light, Sleeping Dogs

Crysis has become infamous for punishing even top-end systems, but let’s be fair: The Metro series matches, if not exceeds its requirement for graphical horsepower. That was proven by the fact that we used Metro 2033 in our testing for a staggering three years – only to be replaced by its sequel, Last Light. I’m not particularly a fan of this series, but I am in awe of its graphics even at modest settings.

Metro Last Light - 1920x1080 Single Monitor

Manual Run-through: Because this game is a real challenge to benchmark with for both the reasons of variability in the results and the raw challenge, I choose to use the built-in benchmark here but rely on Fraps to give me more accurate results.

Note: Metro Last Light‘s built-in benchmark is not representative of the entire game; some levels will punish a GPU much worse than this benchmark will (namely, “The Chase”, which has lots of smoke and explosions). What this means is that while these settings might suffice for much of the game, there might be instances where the performance degrades enough during a certain chapter or portion of a chapter to force a graphics setting tweak.

AMD Radeon R9 260 - Metro Last Light (1920x1080)

It’s becoming increasingly clear that the R7 260 is quite capable for such a well-priced offering, though it wouldn’t surprise us if at some point during the game, the card’s 1GB framebuffer would (or could) cause a bit of degraded performance.

Sleeping Dogs

Many have called Sleeping Dogs (our review) the “Asian Grand Theft Auto“, but the game does a lot of things differently that helps it stand out of the crowd. For example, in lieu of supplying the player with a gazillion guns, Sleeping Dogs focuses heavily on hand-to-hand combat. There are also many collectibles that can be found to help upgrade your character and unlock special fighting abilities – and if you happen to enjoy an Asian atmosphere, this game should fit the bill.

Sleeping Dogs - 1920x1080 Single Monitor

Manual Run-through: The run here takes place during the chapter “Amanda”, on a dark, dank night. The saved game begins us at the first apartment in the game (in North Point), though that’s not where I begin capturing the framerate. Instead, I first request our motorcycle from the garage. Once set, I begin recording the framerate and drive along a specific path all the way to Aberdeen, taking about two minutes.

AMD Radeon R9 260 - Sleeping Dogs (1920x1080)

Like GRID 2, even though the R7 260 only managed 39 FPS here on average, I found it to be suitable enough to keep for the long-haul. However, because the High AA mode doesn’t offer a significant difference in image quality, most will want to knock that down to Normal – the FPS boost will be worth it, as we’ll see on the Best Playable page.


  • http://www.youtube.com/user/no6969el Noel Barcellos

    Not sure if the 260 has support for mantle like you suggested at the end of your article. Other than that great set of information, I think I might just get one for my lady.

    • http://techgage.com/ Rob Williams

      Here’s a slide out of the press deck showing support for Mantle on this GPU. It’s a smart move by AMD… it’s frustrating when companies lob off technologies like these on lower-end parts.

    • RainMotorsports

      GCN is 7730 on up and not sure what GCN version Mantle “requires” 7770 is 1.0 7790 is 1.1. But the R7 240 and above should support mantle if I am not mistaken.

  • christianh

    As I say on every review site… Why test this level card with such a high-priced CPU…?

    It will still be GPU limited with an i5 or Richland…

    • http://techgage.com/ Rob Williams

      The other option would be using a modest CPU and risking the introduction of some bottleneck. That’s not the point here. The PC itself is kept 100% identical; all that changes is the GPU. Which is important, because that’s the focus.

    • RainMotorsports

      In GPU testing nothing but the GPU and driver should ever change. If he swaps the CPU out the results should be considered invalid no matter what any other data says otherwise. Its not very scientific to change static variables.

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