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Thermaltake eSPORTS Level 10 M Gaming Mouse Review
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Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse
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by Ryan Perry on December 10, 2012 in Gaming Peripherals, Keyboards/Mice

In 2010, Thermaltake and BMW DesignworksUSA worked together to bring us the inspired, unique and famously expensive Level 10 chassis. The duo have now branched their partnership out to peripherals, with the first product out of the gate being the Level 10 M gaming mouse. Let’s find out if looks will help you kill.

Introduction

Every so often, we receive a press release announcing the launch of a piece of kit that we just have to look at. For me, the latest has been Thermaltake’s Level 10 M gaming mouse.

For those who don’t know, the Level 10 series started off with a design partnership between Thermaltake and BMW Design Works that resulted in the ultra-high end Level 10 full-tower case. Since then, we’ve seen the incredible (and more affordable) Level 10 GT and GTS full-tower and mid-tower cases, both available in several colors.

Now Thermaltake has moved onto peripherals with the Level 10 M gaming mouse that sports notable features such as an 8200 DPI laser sensor, programmable side buttons, lighting effects and support for profiles and macros.

The Level 10 M is a two button mouse with the clickable scroll wheel in the middle. On the right button are the LED DPI indicators that show which setting is currently active. Behind the left button is a honeycomb design to help keep hands cool by providing ventilation from underneath; further back in the center is an adjustable Allen bolt that allows the top cover to be raised or lowered up to 5mm either way.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

From the left side, the unique design of the Level 10 M can be fully viewed. Most of the body has been left open so the top cover can be adjusted and so air can circulate thanks to the vents mentioned earlier. Also found on the left are the programmable A and B buttons in front of the 5 direction (up, down, left, right, press in) Z button that serves as the DPI and profile selector by default.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

Over on the right side are the C and D buttons that act like the A and B buttons. There is also another Allen bolt towards the back for side-to-side adjustments of the top cover up to a maximum of 5 degrees either way from the center point.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

While belly up we see the laser sensor in the middle surrounded by two large feet in the front and two smaller feet on the sides. The entire bottom plate of the Level 10 M is solid aluminum and makes up the bulk of the weight.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

Included with the mouse are some cards showing the different color choices available (red is absent, as it will launch soon), the software CD, the Allen key used to make adjustments to the top cover, and a handy bag when you need to take your not-so-furry friend on the road.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

As far as software goes, everything can be accessed from one screen. Profiles can be selected across the top and users can choose between normal and “battle” modes where the lighting effects change with each click when set to the latter. The buttons on the mouse diagrams can also be selected to set custom assignments or macros.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

Running on an angle to the right are the buttons that access additional screens. Profile Management does just that and Performance that allows users to change how the mouse will act by modifying settings such as DPI levels or the lift-off rate. The Macro Key screen is where users record custom macros, and the lighting color can be changed or turned off all together on the Light Option screen.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

The remaining screens can be accessed with the buttons on the far right. The T-Key, Single Key, Default and Launch Prgm screens become available when clicking on the buttons on the mouse diagrams, while the Air Through and 3D Axis Movement buttons only serve to launch videos that showcase both features. In the top-right corner are the buttons to set the current profile back to default, take you to the Thermaltake eSports website to register and access the help documentation.

Thermaltake eSports Level 10 Mouse

Now it’s time to see just how the Level 10 M stands up to some abuse after I got my grubby little hand on it.

Page List:
Top

1. Introduction
2. Testing and Final Thoughts


  • D. Pratt

    I got one of these “mice” with my Cyberpower PC and am very disappointed with it. It’s like a small, hand held tank, and is sooooooo slow. Have tried adjusting settings to get this thing to respond properly, but no luck so far. It would have helped if the options were explained in plane English …but no. No manual with the mouse, and nothing on their website to clue me in as to how to configure this thing to perform as good as my 10 dollar microsoft mouse.

    • http://techgage.com/ Jamie Fletcher

      Aren’t over-glorified peripheral drivers fun? Losing basic
      options among needless tabs and menus, blinding you of its purpose with
      graphics. Anyway, there are a few things you can check. First is to make sure
      the DPI settings are increased (I think that is found under ‘Performance’ in
      the mouse settings – http://techgage.com/reviews/thermaltake/level_10_mouse/l10m_07.png).
      You’ll need to drag the bar up on the left to increase it. Another thing to
      check is the Windows OS System Mouse Properties. These settings are independent
      of the driver settings, and are Microsoft’s software override. If using
      Vista/Win7+, you can access these
      settings by going to the start menu and typing ‘Mouse’ in search, and look for
      Mouse under control panel.

      Once inside Mouse Properties, switch to the ‘Pointer
      Options’ tab and increase the pointer speed. You may also want to disable ‘Enhance
      Pointer Precision’ – this is actually the opposite of what it’s name suggests,
      and is in fact Mouse Acceleration, it makes small movements move a little, and
      large movements move a lot. Disabling this option sets the mouse movement
      one-to-one with the surface, reducing your chance of over-shooting a target.

      • D. Pratt

        Hey, thanks for the advice. Unfortunately this particular mouse doesn’t show up in control panel. Still have option of changing settings for Microsoft Mouse that is no longer connected, but not the gaming mouse. Odd, huh?
        Dennis

        • http://techgage.com/ Jamie Fletcher

          Normally, there’s a taskbar icon in the bottom right of the screen, with network connectivity and such. Double clicking that should bring up the Mouse Software. The exact icon, I don’t know, just hover over each to see if any of them say Thermaltake or Tt eSports. You may need to expand the taskbar icons too, to find it.

          • D. Pratt

            Clicked on network icon …and found nothing in the way of software for this mouse. Odd that it should function without showing up somewhere. Using Windows 8 which is Satan’s own OS, so not surprising.
            Dennis

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