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Old 01-16-2010, 12:25 AM   #16
killem2
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I was digging through my random tool crap found 60, 100, 150, 200, 220, and 300 sand paper. There was also this extremely rough green sand paper. Not sure what that was.
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Old 01-16-2010, 08:58 AM   #17
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That's probably aluminum dioxide. Supposed to last longer than the standard stuff, but in truth, it makes little difference (it stays sharper for longer, but it'll get packed with dust and resin just the same). Typically, for wood, the finest grit used is about 400, anything above is polishing or used between treatments, like 800 on Varnish. If your using plastics or metals, then sure, grit can go up to 8000, but it won't do anything for wood.

For finishing, if it's something i want to last a long time, i tend to use Yacht Varnish. But for a computer, ack, i'm kind of worried, flammable treatments, electrostatics, etc.

Joining, i like dove tails/comb joints. They look pretty and are bloody strong if cut correctly, the problem is, any mistake and it's for the world to see, not to mention a poor fit resulting in a wobbly construction. I've just seen so many glue/nailed items fall apart, just but someone knocking them, or something gets dropped on it, etc, though i will concede, they were mass produced items without a workman's finish.

If you have the time, you could always be a little more creative, by using bends and such - using Kerfing for example. You make a section of equally spaced grooves with a saw along the area to be curved, you then steam or soak it in water if you want a tighter bend, then you glue and fold it over a jig, clamping and string binding where needed. You'll probably need something a little stronger than pva, something like a resin based glue, but once set, it's very strong.
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Old 01-18-2010, 01:02 AM   #18
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Ive always wanted to get into bending wood.

I can chisel and carve it out pretty well, and when I get back I hope to work with more natural mediums in it. (logs etc)
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Old 01-18-2010, 09:19 AM   #19
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Hey do you guys know what tool is used to put that small indention on wood for when you put hinges on? So it doesn't bow the parts where the hinge is?
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Old 01-18-2010, 12:29 PM   #20
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Nothing special, it's a chisel. You mark out where the hinge goes, make light indentations with the chisel around the edge, then you remove the wood layer by layer to create a groove for the hinge to rest. Just pilot the holes and use flat head screws.
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:19 PM   #21
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Sharp chisels are your friend
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:46 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Psi* View Post
Sharp chisels are your friend
Indeed. The sharper the better. It is worth the time to invest in learning how to sharpen chisels/tools as well, preferably with a progressive set of finer whetstone's. Only use a grinder to get rid of any dents or chips, you can't use them for final sharpening and honing the edge. With something like pine, it should be like carving butter with a knife, if you have to push too hard, then your either taking too much off in one go - or it isn't sharp enough.

And don't get cheap chisels... trying to use unhardened mild steel as a chisel is just asking for trouble... A lot cheap chisels are just surface hardened and or low carbon steel, meaning they work for about 5 mins, then when you sharpen them and grind away the surface layer, you might as well use a spoon...

But all this kind of goes without saying...
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Old 01-19-2010, 12:30 AM   #23
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I personally have quite the collection of chisels. I like carving

It depends on the shape of the hinge for the shape of the chisel you want to use at times. Be sure to buy a rubber mallet or hammer for chips, unless you want to slide, but that takes some practice to do exact.

I suggest (if you are going to use a chisel) to use a chisel to indent the line around your hinge and then come in softly to that line from the edge of the wood. Be sure not to indent too deep... this can be tricky if it is your first time... get some scrap pine and practice with chisel or two if you think you might need to.

There is an attachment for a dremel these days that acts like a router of sorts. Its not bad, but it too takes some time to get used to, imo anyways...
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Old 01-19-2010, 01:00 AM   #24
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What an amazing thread! I am learning a TON about wood working!
Cant waitto see the progress on this build!

I, myself, have never worked with wood as a primary build mechanism, I've only built rudimentary jigs for bending acrylic around and such. So, I'll be watching with great interest to see how this progresses and will offer up any input I can *if* it is helpful.

Best of luck, and the only thing I can offer up right now is "speed kills" and "be patient!"

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Old 01-20-2010, 01:20 AM   #25
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Oh also





Got muh fans in today !
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Old 01-21-2010, 06:29 PM   #26
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What would you suggest for the fan holes i tried a new jig saw i just bought on a practice piece and the blade tilts just slightly and the holes looks stupid.

Is there anything more precise?
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:14 PM   #27
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Not sure what you mean the tilted blade on the jig saw ... trying to picture in head, but it is not developing.

Anyway, check out a saber saw. Some come with a compass attachment ... just listen to Danny
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Old 01-21-2010, 09:05 PM   #28
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If the blade is tilting, there are a number of reasons....
One, the jigsaw 'jig'/guide isn't straight (some can lean up to 45 degree), make sure it is properly 0'd out.
Second, your not pushing down firmly enough and the saw is bouncing up and down causing the blade to wobble around.
Third, your using the wrong type of blade - the harder the material, the more teeth per inch you'll need, as using a standard wood blade on MDF will cause the blade to wobble since the teeth are too big and it'll try to cut too much material in one go.

Using a jigsaw is not exactly easy to begin with, since you need a strong grip and steady hand. You won't get a perfect circle with one, but they can do good curves. If your going to be making several holes, then you could make a single template/jig and then use a Router.

Of course, you can get large circle cutter bits for drills.... they like to wobble a bit and take a bit of time to cut through something and are bessed used with a drill press.... like the following....
http://www.woodcraft.com/Family/2000...e-Cutters.aspx
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Old 01-22-2010, 11:29 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tharic-Nar View Post
If the blade is tilting, there are a number of reasons....
One, the jigsaw 'jig'/guide isn't straight (some can lean up to 45 degree), make sure it is properly 0'd out.
Second, your not pushing down firmly enough and the saw is bouncing up and down causing the blade to wobble around.
Third, your using the wrong type of blade - the harder the material, the more teeth per inch you'll need, as using a standard wood blade on MDF will cause the blade to wobble since the teeth are too big and it'll try to cut too much material in one go.

Using a jigsaw is not exactly easy to begin with, since you need a strong grip and steady hand. You won't get a perfect circle with one, but they can do good curves. If your going to be making several holes, then you could make a single template/jig and then use a Router.

Of course, you can get large circle cutter bits for drills.... they like to wobble a bit and take a bit of time to cut through something and are bessed used with a drill press.... like the following....
http://www.woodcraft.com/Family/2000...e-Cutters.aspx
Is a router a table top tool? My father in law has this huge thing in his garage that has a swivel based thing that can cut wood in addition to his table saw (which I know what that is)
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Old 01-22-2010, 01:42 PM   #30
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A Router (woodworking kind - not the networking kind), is either a hand-held or table top - High speed (30k rpm), small bit, cutting tool, think of a dremel on steroids. The bits come in many shapes and sizes, so it can do decorative finishes, grooves, curves, etc. They're usually used in conjunction with guides and jigs, since they are very hard to control free-hand. Typically, you fit a small guide wheel above the Bit, press the Router down against the surface your cutting (with guides set), start it up and then push the guide wheel against the jig. The bench kind are used extensively for making decorative coving, Dado rails and skirting boards.
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