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AMD Radeon VII 1440p, 4K & Ultrawide Gaming Performance

AMD Radeon VII 7nm Graphics Card Thumb

Date: February 7, 2019
Author(s): Rob Williams

AMD’s competition has launched four current-gen GPUs since the fall, so its fans have understandably been anxious for a follow up to 2017’s RX Vega. With the new Radeon VII, AMD is responding. It’s the “world’s first 7nm gaming” GPU, and with 16GB of VRAM, it’s one that’s built for high detail at high resolution.



A Look At Radeon VII & Our Test Suite

In the lead-up to last month’s CES, the rumor mill seemed to be on fire with AMD speculation. One rumor was of an RX Vega follow-up, and lo and behold, Lisa Su announced the Vega-based Radeon VII during AMD’s first-ever CES keynote. The card becomes the world’s first gaming GPU built on a 7nm process, and with 16GB of memory under its hood, it’s built for heavy workloads.

The “VII” in Radeon VII represents the fact that the card is built using 7nm, and also that it’s a follow-up to the original Vega, which spawned RX Vega 56 and 64. The new card has a cool name, but it doesn’t exactly open the doors for bigger or smaller models, and that’s likely on purpose.

AMD Radeon VII - Overview

During a briefing with AMD a few weeks ago to discuss the Radeon VII, we were surprised by the fact that the company jumped into a look at creative workloads before gaming ones, despite the card being touted as the “world’s first 7nm gaming” GPU. Highlighting VII’s gaming focus is likely for marketing more than anything else, because “world’s first 7nm jack-of-all-trades card” doesn’t have the same ring to it. With its “do everything” ambition, the Radeon VII is similar to NVIDIA’s TITAN series. It just doesn’t have the Tensor or RT cores that the TITAN RTX does (but its saving grace is that it costs 1/4th as much).

With 16GB of HBM2, Radeon VII feels like a professional-grade card out-of-the-gate, and at launch, we questioned whether or not it should have been called the Radeon Pro VII (or even Frontier Edition 2). We’re talking 1TB/s of available memory bandwidth, after all. Creative users will lust for that long before gamers will.

AMD’s Radeon Gaming GPU Lineup
CoresBase MHzPeak FP32MemoryBandwidthTDPPrice
Radeon VII3840140013.8 TFLOPS16 GB 41 TB/s300W$699
Vega 644096154612.6 TFLOPS8 GB 4484 GB/s295W$499
Vega 563584147110.5 TFLOPS8 GB 4410 GB/s210W$449
RX 590230415767.1 TFLOPS8 GB 3256 GB/s225W$279
RX 580230413406.1 TFLOPS8 GB 3256 GB/s185W$229
RX 570204812445.1 TFLOPS8 GB 3224 GB/s150W$179
RX 56089611752.6 TFLOPS4 GB 3112 GB/s80W$119
RX 55064011831.2 TFLOPS2 GB 3112 GB/s50W$99
Notes1 GDDR6; 2 GDDR5X; 3 GDDR5; 4 HBM2
Architecture: Radeon RX 550~590 = Polaris; Radeon VII, RX Vega 56 & 64 = Vega

The move to 7nm helps AMD develop a GPU that’s more power efficient, but what fun would there be in releasing a product that only delivered the same performance, but at less power? It’s much better when we get far greater performance for the same power – or perhaps 5W more than RX Vega 64, as AMD’s spec sheet shows.

As our power testing will highlight later, AMD’s TDP spec doesn’t align with our real-world testing, but that’s a good thing, since VII draws a good deal less power than the Vega 64, despite its big performance boost, and having twice the amount of HBM2.

AMD Radeon VII GPU Die

On the topic of VRAM, AMD’s marketing push with this card hovers a lot around the importance of future-proofing ourselves with lots of memory. As games with bigger textures get released, and we play our games at higher resolutions, the need for more GPU memory is undoubtedly going to increase.

I admit I do find some of AMD’s assumptions to be a little slanted, though. I don’t personally think 16GB of VRAM is going to do many people much good with gaming now, or in the next few years – and by the time a few years pass, we’ll have new GPUs to use.

In the press deck (slide seen below), AMD highlights 11GB as being “required” for gaming in 2019, which isn’t even close to being the case. Also strange is that the marker is notches higher than the 11GB it references, exaggerating the differences a bit.

AMD Radeon VII - VRAM Discussion Slide Deck

The reviewer’s guide breaks down a few modern games that can use more than 8GB of VRAM, but I consider this flawed based on the fact that current memory tools only detect whether or not memory is allocated, not if all of that allocated data is required. Do you really believe Black Ops 4 needs 12GB of VRAM? Or that Star Control: Origins needs 9GB? I’m not convinced.

AMD Radeon VII - VRAM Discussion Reviewer's Guide

With VII being derived from Instinct, it feels to me like AMD was forced to a 16GB VRAM config, and now has to justify that reality through what I’d consider to be misleading marketing. Ultimately, it feels like AMD didn’t even know where to target this card, so it just decided to target it everywhere. That even includes 1080p resolution. That’s a resolution we haven’t used in our high-end GPU launch reviews since 2014. How many people need 300+ FPS in Siege, really?

To add to this, the night prior to this article’s embargo lift, AMD told us that it decided to increase the double-precision (FP64) performance on this card to twice what was previously announced – which was already twice what we were told after CES. AMD’s RX Vega 64 offered about 0.8 TFLOPS of FP64, whereas Radeon VII, after AMD’s whim, becomes 3.52 TFLOPS. That means the card doesn’t just target gaming and creative, but now also science and finance. For comparison’s sake, the 2080 Ti offers 0.42 TFLOPS of FP64 performance.

The upside to any confusion surrounding Radeon VII is that the card is a good jack-of-all-trades. It’s going to be a solid option for most workloads, and now with increased FP64, it becomes a relative steal at $700 to those who need it. Two of these GPUs would give us the same spec’d FP64 performance as one TITAN V.

With gaming, which happens to be the focus of this article (I know, it’s hard to tell), we have many benchmarks that will help us turn our gaming assumptions into answers. Another article takes a look at the card’s workstation performance, so feel free to open that one in a new tab!

A Look At Testing Methodology

Techgage Gaming GPU Test PC
ProcessorIntel Core i9-9900K (3.6GHz Base, 5.0GHz Turbo, 8C/16T)
MotherboardASUS ROG STRIX Z390-E GAMING
CPU tested with BIOS 0602 (October 19, 2018)
MemoryG.SKILL TridentZ (F4-3400C16-8GSXW) 8GB x 2
Operates at DDR4-3400 16-16-16 (1.35V)
AMD GraphicsAMD Radeon VII (16GB; Jan 22 Press Driver)
AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 (8GB; Jan 22 Press Driver)
AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 (8GB; Radeon 18.12.3) *
AMD Radeon RX 590 (8GB; Radeon 18.12.3) *
AMD Radeon RX 580 (8GB; Radeon 18.12.3) *
AMD Radeon RX 570 (4GB; Radeon 18.12.3) *
AMD Radeon RX 550 (2GB; Radeon 18.12.3) *
NVIDIA GraphicsNVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (11GB; GeForce 417.71)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 (8GB; GeForce 417.71)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 (8GB; GeForce 417.71)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 (6GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA TITAN Xp (12GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB; GeForce 417.71)
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (8GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti (8GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (8GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (6GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (4GB; GeForce 417.35) *
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (2GB; GeForce 417.35) *
StorageKingston SSDNow V310 960GB (SATA 6Gbps)
Power SupplyCorsair RM650x (650W)
ChassisNZXT S340 Elite Mid-tower
CoolingCorsair Hydro H100i V2 AIO Liquid Cooler (240mm)
Et ceteraWindows 10 Pro (64-bit; build 17763)
Notes* Synthetic tests only.

Games Tested & Vendor Neutrality

A total of eight games are included in our current test suite. Recent additions include Battlefield V, Forza Horizon 4, and Shadow of the Tomb Raider. Beyond these eight titles, UL’s 3DMark and VRMark, as well as Unigine’s Superposition, are used for some quick and dirty tests that you may be able to run at home.

Here’s the full list of tested synthetic benchmarks, games, and developer allegiances:


Battlefield 1 - Techgage Tested Settings (1) Battlefield 1 - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Battlefield V as-tested settings
Battlefield 1 - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Battlefield 1 - Techgage Tested Settings (2) Battlefield 1 - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Battlefield V as-tested settings
Battlefield 1 - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (1) Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Deus Ex: Mankind Divided as-tested settings
Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (2) Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Deus Ex: Mankind Divided as-tested settings
Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (3) Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (3)
Deus Ex: Mankind Divided as-tested settings
Deus Ex Mankind Divided - Techgage Tested Settings (3)
F1 2018 - Techgage Tested Settings (1) F1 2018 - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
F1 2018 as-tested settings
F1 2018 - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
F1 2018 - Techgage Tested Settings (2) F1 2018 - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
F1 2018 as-tested settings
F1 2018 - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (1) Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Far Cry 5 as-tested settings
Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (2) Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Far Cry 5 as-tested settings
Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (3) Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (3)
Far Cry 5 as-tested settings
Far Cry 5 - Techgage Tested Settings (3)
Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings
Forza Horizon 4 as-tested settings
Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings
Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings
Forza Horizon 4 as-tested settings
Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings
Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings
Forza Horizon 4 as-tested settings
Fortnite - Techgage Tested Settings
Monster Hunter World - Techgage Tested Settings (1) Monster Hunter World - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Monster Hunter World as-tested settings
Monster Hunter World - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Monster Hunter World - Techgage Tested Settings (2) Monster Hunter World - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Monster Hunter World as-tested settings
Monster Hunter World - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Rise of the Tomb Raider - Techgage Tested Settings (1) Rise of the Tomb Raider - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Shadow of the Tomb Raider as-tested settings
Rise of the Tomb Raider - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Rise of the Tomb Raider - Techgage Tested Settings (2) Rise of the Tomb Raider - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Shadow of the Tomb Raider as-tested settings
Rise of the Tomb Raider - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands - Techgage Tested Settings (1) Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands as-tested settings
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands - Techgage Tested Settings (1)
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands - Techgage Tested Settings (2) Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands - Techgage Tested Settings (2)
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands as-tested settings
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands - Techgage Tested Settings (2)

For our apples-to-apples testing, the graphics settings seen above apply to every one of our tested resolutions so as to deliver easily comparable results. In most cases, each configuration is tested twice, with more runs added if the initial results make the extra testing necessary (which isn’t required too often).

Gaming: Battlefield V, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, F1 2018 & Far Cry 5

Battlefield V

Battlefield V
Battlefield V (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Battlefield V (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Battlefield V (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

The VII kicks off our performance look with some solid results. It and NVIDIA’s RTX 2080 effectively offer equal performance in this particular title. It’s worth noting that AMD’s card doesn’t support the game’s DXR ray traced feature, which is very cool, but not particularly important. If you want high resolutions like 3440x and 4K+, DXR wouldn’t be an option anyway.

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

Deus Ex Mankind Divided
Deus Ex Mankind Divided (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Deus Ex Mankind Divided (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Deus Ex Mankind Divided (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

The VII continues to shine, outperforming the 2080 in all resolutions in Deus Ex: Mankind Divided. At 1440p, the gap is actually pretty significant at 8 FPS, which is whittled down to 3 FPS at 4K. Fortunately for NVIDIA, its 2080 Ti isn’t sweating losing the top spot.

F1 2018

F1 2018
F1 2018 (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
F1 2018 (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
F1 2018 (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

Like many other racing titles, the smoother the F1 series runs, the better the experience. Fortunately, you really don’t need that powerful of a GPU to get great frame rates out of this one. Even the Vega 64 hits 83 FPS average at 1440p, which is more than satisfactory for max detail.

Unlike the previous titles, which showed the VII to about match (or exceed) RTX 2080 performance, NVIDIA strikes back hard here. At 4K, the VII is suitable for about 60 FPS, but the 2080 has it beat by 8 FPS.

Far Cry 5

Far Cry 5
Far Cry 5 (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Far Cry 5 (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Far Cry 5 (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

With Far Cry 5, we return to equalization between the RTX 2080 and Radeon VII. Interestingly, the RTX 2080 delivered a slightly better minimum on each run, but the VII led with the best average FPS result. So far, things are looking good for the VII, so let’s see how another four titles fare (on the next page!)

Gaming: Forza Horizon 4, Monster Hunter, SotTR & Ghost Recon Wildlands

Forza Horizon 4

Forza Horizon 4
Forza Horizon 4 (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Forza Horizon 4 (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Forza Horizon 4 (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

The VII continues to perform very closely to NVIDIA’s RTX 2080, which is good to see. Another take is that the VII continues to outperform last gen’s 1080 Ti, which RX Vega 64 desperately hoped to match. It might have taken another year and a half, but AMD’s accomplished it.

That said, FH4 is one title that gave us issues in testing. On occasion, the game would crash to desktop, with nary an error, or lock up, requiring a hard reboot. This is one of two games we had issues with, and AMD alleges that the issues will disappear with the post-launch driver release. We’ll be ready to test once that driver drops, to check up on that promise.

Monster Hunter World

Monster Hunter World
Monster Hunter World (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Monster Hunter World (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Monster Hunter World (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

The 2080 Ti does a good job here of separating itself from the rest of the pack, and in the usual matchup between the 2080 and VII, we again see NVIDIA take the lead. At 4K, this game is truly hard on the graphics processor. It might be worth noting that the “High” detail setting is used for testing, which isn’t the highest – so this game might prove to be a good benchmark for some time to come. Especially now that it has ultrawide support!

Shadow of the Tomb Raider

Shadow of the Tomb Raider
Shadow of the Tomb Raider (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Shadow of the Tomb Raider (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Shadow of the Tomb Raider (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

At both 1440p and ultrawide, the RTX 2080 outperformed the VII, but at 4K, the cards are about matched. Well, at the top-end; at minimum, the VII proved 5 FPS better. That’s not too bad, considering the fact that SotTR is an NVIDIA-sponsored title.

Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands

Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands (1440p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

At the top of the page, we mentioned that Forza Horizon 4 was one title that gave us issues in benchmarking (only on Radeon VII). Wildlands is the second game, but its reaction to VII was much more severe than FH4‘s.

Because we didn’t want to drop one of our eight games, we benchmarked the timedemo using Fraps instead of letting the game tell us the result, as the benchmark crashes at the end of its run, before it can show a result, every single time. Fortunately, the Fraps method of recording the framerate gives the exact same results, so we can see how the VII fares, even though Wildlands kind of hates it.

To be clear, this game is simply unplayable on Radeon VII as of the time of writing. Even sitting at the main menu, the game will eventually lock up, or the entire PC. As covered above, AMD says this issue will be fixed in the post-launch driver.

Looking beyond that rather severe issue, the VII delivered solid performance in Wildlands, not falling too far behind NVIDIA, which sponsors it as a The Way It’s Meant To Be Played title.

Synthetic: 3DMark, VRMark & Superposition

UL 3DMark

UL 3DMark Fire Strike (1080p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
UL 3DMark Fire Strike (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
UL 3DMark Time Spy Extreme (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

NVIDIA’s 2080 beats out AMD’s Radeon VII in the 1080p Fire Strike test, but the VII redeems itself at 4K, pressing 400 points ahead of the 2080. With the DX12-bound Time Spy, also at 4K, NVIDIA leaps to the top of the charts, sitting only behind the 2080 Ti. Somehow, NVIDIA’s RTX absolutely dominates Time Spy, evidenced also by comparing the RTX 2060 to the Vega 64 and GTX 1080.

UL VRMark

Futuremark VRMark Cyan Room
UL VRMark (Cyan Room) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
UL VRMark (Blue Room) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

In Time Spy, NVIDIA’s strong DX12 performance (in that particular test) pushed the RTX 2080 far ahead of the VII, and we see the same thing happen here, in VRMark. With the Cyan room, which is also DX12, the VII sits just a bit behind the 2080. With the Blue room, which represents future VR workloads, the VII falls much further behind, looking at the 1080 Ti’s back.

Unigine Superposition

Unigine Superposition
Unigine Superposition (1080p) - AMD Radeon VII Performance
Unigine Superposition (4K) - AMD Radeon VII Performance

To wrap up our performance testing, Superposition actually weighs the RTX 2070 higher than the Radeon VII at 1080p (with Extreme settings), but at 4K (with Optimized settings), those roles are reversed. It’s hard to gauge how important a test like this is in comparison to actual gaming, but it’s good to see the VII comfortably outperform the Vega 64 in every possible case.

Power Consumption & Final Thoughts

Power Consumption

Power Consumption - AMD Radeon VII

To test for power consumption, a Kill-A-Watt that the PC itself is plugged into is used for monitoring a Far Cry 5 4K benchmark run. Admittedly, we don’t have the best methods for power testing, and would love to improve them in the future, but for now, we use what we have, and that’s our eyeballs. Over the course of the one-minute benchmark, a rough average is pulled.

7nm can of course mean less power draw, and in Radeon VII’s case, it manages to draw ~50W less than the Vega 64, while easily outperforming it at the same time. Of course, RX Vega’s high power draw can be remedied with Wattman, but sadly, most people won’t know to use it, so it’s nice to see VII’s power draw to be a lot more modest out-of-the-gate. It could possibly be improved further if you want to spend time in Wattman, but up to this point, time hasn’t allowed us to dig into that.

Final Thoughts

It feels weird to summarize a graphics card for gaming use when it feels so much like a workstation card, but fortunately, we have another article to dive deeper into that side of the market. To wrap things up in this article, we want focus on gaming – especially for the “World’s First 7nm gaming” GPU.

Is this world-first worth $699? That is going to largely depend on your level of enthusiasm for buying a card that offers a bit less performance than the RTX 2080, but for the same amount of money. Across our twenty-six sets of results from real games (not synthetics), NVIDIA led the pack fifteen times, sometimes to a significant degree (mostly in Monster Hunter World and F1 2018.)

AMD Radeon VII - Overview

If you’re indifferent to features like Microsoft’s DXR, and NVIDIA’s own technologies like DLSS, Ansel, and don’t mind slightly weaker performance, then the Radeon VII could serve you well. For gamers who are also content creators, the card looks even better. For those folks, 16GB for $700 will seem like a steal, especially when AMD’s OpenCL performance is as strong as it is (the compute article can fill you in).

When all is said and done, general performance expectations of the Radeon VII based on our testing can be seen in this table:

Game Performance Expectations

1080p1440p3440×14404K144Hz
RTX 2080 Ti★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
RTX 2080★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
Radeon VII★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
TITAN Xp★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
GTX 1080 Ti★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
RTX 2070★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
GTX 1080★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
RX Vega 64★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
GTX 1070 Ti★★★★★★★★★★★
RX Vega 56★★★★★★★★★★★
RTX 2060★★★★★★★★★★★
GTX 1070★★★★★★★★★
RX 580★★★★★
GTX 1060★★★★★
RX 570★★★★★
GTX 1050 Ti★★
RX 560★★
GTX 1050
RX 550
144Hz values estimated for high detail 1080p 144 FPS.
★★★★★ 60 FPS? More like 100 FPS. As future-proofed as it can get.
★★★★ Surpass 60 FPS at high quality settings with ease.
★★★ Hit 60 FPS with high quality settings.
★★ Nothing too impressive; it gets the job done (60 FPS will require tweaking).
★ Not recommended.

NVIDIA’s RTX 2080 beat out AMD’s Radeon VII in the majority of our tests, but ultimately, both cards perform about the same. It’d be hard to award an extra star somewhere to one card over another, because both trade punches, and NVIDIA doesn’t deliver so much extra performance in all of its cases to warrant a bump. Ultimately, the 2080 Ti should be your choice if you want the best possible 4K experience. Otherwise, both the Radeon VII and 2080 offer very good performance.

Unfortunately, my experience with Radeon VII was marred with issues in two of the eight games tested, especially with Wildlands, which simply refused to complete a benchmark run without crashing (and again, even sitting at the main menu will encourage a spontaneous crash at some point).

In talking to site friends who also have the VII in for testing, I can say that no one was able to report similar crashes to me, although none of them test with either of the two games that bugged out on us (the second one being Forza Horizon 4). I do expect these issues to be fixed, but would have loved to have not seen them in 25% of the games I tested with. Fortunately, I didn’t encounter any real issues when testing the VII for workstation performance (again, head here if you want to read that).

If there’s another caveat with VII to be aware of, it’s that its fan noise is loud in comparison to NVIDIA’s cards. In testing the six GPUs for gaming here, only the Vega 64 and VII stood out to me on the noise-front. I watched a fair bit of TV while running all of this benchmarking, and with the VII (and V64), I had to crank the volume on the TV in order to hear it, whereas when the NVIDIA cards were testing, I didn’t even think of it. It doesn’t take a hardcore workload to hear the card, either. Merely sitting at a game’s main menu would cause it to happen to us.

As mentioned in the power section above, AMD’s tools can help you refine things to make the situation better, but we didn’t have time to dig in before embargo. For headphones users, this noise might not matter much, but if you use speakers, you are going to easily hear the VII above any other recent card, at least without tweaking.

AMD Radeon Full Loaded Bundle

We didn’t want to finish up this look without a mention of AMD’s ongoing game bundle, which applies just fine to the new Radeon VII. Purchased separately, these games would cost you about $180, so if you’re keen on them, that is a substantial savings. Even if you were planning to purchase only one of these games, that’s still money saved. And, if you didn’t want any of them, you’re probably more concerned about your creative work that needs tackling!

By now, you should know whether or not a Radeon VII is for you, and if you deem that one is, then hopefully you will be able to find one in stock soon. Pre-launch rumors claimed that availability would be pretty rough at launch, but we have quite literally no knowledge on the actuality of card supply. All we can do is hope there’s enough for those who want it, if not now, then soon.

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