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NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 2060 & 2070 SUPER At 1080p, 1440p & Ultrawide

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER Thumb

Date: July 6, 2019
Author(s): Rob Williams

The first Turing GeForce cards released almost ten months ago, so it’s time for an upgrade – perhaps even a “SUPER” one? With a new title to hit the GeForce line, we’re getting just that with updated RTX 2060 and 2070s, and promises of an updated 2080 coming SUPER soon. Let’s see what the first new cards are made of.



A Look At GeForce SUPER & Our Test Suite

If you ever feel like the graphics card market is stale, just wait a little bit longer. It seems that without fail, we’re hit with a deluge of releases all at once – a reality exasperated right now by the fact that AMD not only has its own new GPUs releasing soon, but new CPUs, as well.

Ahead of AMD’s launch, NVIDIA wanted to remind the world that it has an answer to every conceivable AMD desktop GPU, even before a new threat has the chance to arrive. This latest response to pending competition comes to us in the form of SUPER, impacting three models: RTX 2060, 2070, and soon, 2080.

The three SUPER models all feature slightly increased core counts over their respective originals, while the 2060 SUPER gains an additional boost by way of an increased framebuffer size. Considering that we’re talking about a $400 GPU here, it’s nice to see an 8GB 2060 finally available.

Presumably because of that framebuffer augmentation, the RTX 2060 SUPER is being treated as a separate model in the lineup, demanding a $50 premium over the non-SUPER, which puts it at $399. The original 2070 and 2080 models, however, are going to completely replace the previous iterations, and retain their price tags ($499 for 2070, and $699 for 2080).

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER and RTX 2070 SUPER

Here’s a specs table to help you get a better impression of NVIDIA’s current and last-gen offerings:

NVIDIA’s GeForce Gaming GPU Lineup
CoresBase MHzPeak FP32MemoryBandwidthTDPSRP
TITAN RTX4608177016.3 TFLOPS24GB 1672 GB/s280W$1,199
RTX 2080 Ti4352135013.4 TFLOPS11GB 1616 GB/s250W$999
RTX 2080 SUPER3072165011.1 TFLOPS8GB 1496 GB/s250W$699
RTX 20802944151510.0 TFLOPS8GB 1448 GB/s215W$699
RTX 2070 SUPER256016059.1 TFLOPS8GB 1448 GB/s215W$499
RTX 2070230414107.4 TFLOPS8GB 1448 GB/s175W$499
RTX 2060 SUPER217614707.2 TFLOPS8GB 1448 GB/s175W$399
RTX 2060192016806.4 TFLOPS6GB 1336 GB/s160W$349
GTX 1660 Ti153615005.5 TFLOPS6GB 1288 GB/s120W$279
GTX 1660140815305 TFLOPS6GB 1192 GB/s120W$279
GTX 165089614853 TFLOPS4GB 1128 GB/s75W$279
TITAN Xp3840140512.1 TFLOPS12GB 2548 GB/s250W$1,199
GTX 1080 Ti3584148011.3 TFLOPS11GB 2484 GB/s250W$699
GTX 1080256017338.8 TFLOPS8GB 2320 GB/s180W$499
GTX 1070 Ti243216078.1 TFLOPS8GB 3256 GB/s180W$449
GTX 1070192015066.4 TFLOPS8GB 3256 GB/s150W$379
GTX 1060128017004.3 TFLOPS6GB 3192 GB/s120W$299
GTX 1050 Ti76813922.1 TFLOPS4GB 3112 GB/s75W$139
GTX 105064014551.8 TFLOPS2GB 3112 GB/s75W$109
Notes1 GDDR6; 2 GDDR5X; 3 GDDR5; 4 HBM2
Architecture: GTX & TITAN = Pascal; RTX = Turing

This table doesn’t take Tensor and RT cores into consideration, which NVIDIA exclusively offers on its RTX cards. With Tensor cores, gamers can take advantage of deep-learning super-sampling anti-aliasing (DLSS) in supported games, effectively enhancing the level of detail in a scene (but to hit-or-miss effect right now).

So far, it seems like many more game developers are more jazzed over real-time ray tracing. That’s especially the case when you look back at E3, which saw a handful of great games vow their support. That includes Cyberpunk 2077, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, Control, and Watch Dogs: Legion. We ultimately hoped to tackle RTX performance for this review, but some software fought with us too much (more in the methodology section), so it will come later.

Cyberpunk 2077 Outdoor RTX Environment

For creators, RTX’s RT cores will deliver real-time ray tracing to give immediate feedback on scene updates. This kind of interactive rendering used to be abysmally slow, but real-time ray tracing can speed it up to the point of acceptable performance. More software is coming out with this support all of the time, and we’d expect that by the winter, all of the major consumer rendering solutions will include RTX support in some way.

All three of the new SUPER cards give a boost to performance on all RTX fronts, including “rays cast” and TFLOPS performance for deep-learning. So, even without the general GPU core boost, these cards will enable even greater ray tracing performance. That may still only mean a few FPS at each tick, given how computationally demanding it is, but that added performance is even more critical at the sub-60 FPS range.

We’ll take a look at creator and ray tracing gaming performance in the weeks ahead. For now, let’s quickly explore our gaming test system and suite, and then get right into a look at the performance.

A Look At Test Methodology

Techgage Gaming GPU Test PC
ProcessorIntel Core i9-9900K (3.6GHz Base, 5.0GHz Turbo, 8C/16T)
MotherboardASUS ROG STRIX Z390-E GAMING
CPU tested with BIOS 1005 (April 10, 2019)
MemoryG.SKILL TridentZ (F4-3400C16-8GSXW) 8GB x 2
Operates at DDR4-3200 14-14-14 (1.35V)
AMD GraphicsAMD Radeon RX Vega 64 (8GB; Radeon 19.6.3)
AMD Radeon RX 590 (8GB; Radeon 19.6.3)
NVIDIA GraphicsNVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER (8GB; GeForce 430.86)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER (8GB; GeForce 430.86)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 (8GB; GeForce 430.86)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 (6GB; GeForce 430.86)
StorageKingston SSDNow V310 960GB (SATA 6Gbps)
Power SupplyCorsair RM650x (650W)
ChassisNZXT S340 Elite Mid-tower
CoolingCorsair Hydro H100i V2 AIO Liquid Cooler (240mm)
Et ceteraWindows 10 Pro (64-bit; build 18362)

All GPUs have been tested with up-to-date drivers, and for the first time for our gaming suite, in the updated Windows 10 May Update. Our OS install is kept as clean and optimized as possible to reduce possible benchmark interference, ensuring accurate results. V-Sync, G-SYNC and FreeSync are disabled at the monitor and driver level.

Games Tested & Vendor Neutrality

A total of ten games are included in our current test suite. Recent additions include Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six: Siege and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive for some super-high FPS eSports testing, as well as the new F1 2019Metro ExodusThe Division 2, and Total War: Three Kingdoms. Meanwhile, Battlefield VFar Cry 5Monster Hunter: WorldShadow of the Tomb Raider, and the usual assortment of synthetics make a return in our updated suite.

Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z) Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Counter-Strike: Global Offensive
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Monster Hunter: World
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
dBpoweramp - Convert FLAC to MP3 dBpoweramp - Convert FLAC to MP3
Shadow of the Tomb Raider
dBpoweramp - Convert FLAC to MP3
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z) Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z) Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Total War: Three Kingdoms
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Unigine Superposition
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View

On the topic of suite overhauls, this is the first one where we’ve done testing to generate percentile results. Only a couple of games are measured this way right now, but we plan to expand such testing with future benchmark runs.

Here’s the full list of tested synthetic benchmarks, games, and developer allegiances:

This collection of games gives us a nice blend of DirectX 11 and 12 APIs, but it unfortunately lacks both Vulkan and ray tracing testing. We tried to include Rage 2 for a Vulkan performance angle, until a patch stopped the game from working on our NVIDIA install (even after an OS reinstall). We then moved on with World War Z, which doesn’t let you screenshot its results screen, and can randomly boot up as DX11 instead of Vulkan. We often don’t know when to accept defeat, but with so much testing going on right now, we had to just scrap Vulkan for now.

Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Battlefield V - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z) Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Battlefield V - Tested Settings (2)
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z) Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Counter-Strike: Global Offensive - Tested Settings (1)
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Counter-Strike: Global Offensive - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
F1 2019 - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
F1 2019 - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
dBpoweramp - Convert FLAC to MP3 dBpoweramp - Convert FLAC to MP3
Far Cry 5 - Tested Settings (1)
dBpoweramp - Convert FLAC to MP3
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z) Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
Far Cry 5 - Tested Settings (2)
Intel Core i7-6700K (CPU-Z & GPU-Z)
CyberPowerPC AMD VR Gaming PC - Keyboard Switches CyberPowerPC AMD VR Gaming PC - Keyboard Switches
Far Cry 5 - Tested Settings (3)
CyberPowerPC AMD VR Gaming PC - Keyboard Switches
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Monster Hunter: World - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Monster Hunter: World - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Shadow of the Tomb Raider - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Shadow of the Tomb Raider - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege - Tested Settings (3)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 - Tested Settings (3)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 - Tested Settings (4)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 - Tested Settings (5)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 - Tested Settings (6)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Total War: Three Kingdoms - Tested Settings (1)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View
Total War: Three Kingdoms - Tested Settings (2)
Sony Ps4 Pro Angled View

Note: You can download all of the tested setting images at once here (ZIP, 7MB).

On the ray tracing side, we planned to use Battlefield V until activation DRM stepped in. We then tried to use Metro Exodus‘ external benchmark tool, but it would crash before the content could open, which is the same issue we had at its launch. Suffice to say, this article lacks certain results we wanted to get in, but there are many more to help make up for it. And with that, let’s get right to it, starting with Drmfield V.

Gaming: Battlefield V, F1 2019, Far Cry 5, Metro Exodus

Battlefield V

Battlefield V
Battlefield V (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Battlefield V (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Battlefield V (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

From the get-go, we can see some clear improvements SUPER brings to the table. Both respective models provide a nice boost to performance over the non-SUPERs, but ultimately, the entire collection here is suitable enough for either 1080p or 1440p. An exception might be with the RX 590, since its minimum falls a fair bit below 60, and since our benchmark doesn’t represent online play, we’d expect the going to get much tougher there.

All of NVIDIA’s GPUs listed here handle Battlefield V fine at ultrawide, but AMD’s cards struggle. Oddly, the Vega 64 gave us an almost crippled minimum FPS, of half its average. The RX 590 didn’t fare the same way, but its overall performance at that resolution is lacking.

F1 2019

Formula 1 2019
F1 2019 (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
F1 2019 (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
F1 2019 (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

The SUPER cards continue to outpace their predecessors to a fair degree, with the 146 FPS result of the 2070 SUPER at 1080p being quite attractive. It can be argued that a game like F1 doesn’t need super high-frame rates, and that might be true for competitive play, but if you have a 144Hz monitor, you definitely want to take full advantage of it.

As we move up the resolution ladder, the pain gets more real, but every GPU other than the RX 590 delivers suitable performance. These charts are going to look a lot more interesting once the RX 5700 series get added.

Far Cry 5

Far Cry 5
Far Cry 5 (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Far Cry 5 (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Far Cry 5 (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

With the performance delivered by the RTX 2070 SUPER, it’s the most suitable 4K gaming card of this bunch. Admittedly, that resolution could have been tested on that GPU and the few below it, but testing all of the hardware we have on hand can’t get done quick enough. We’ll be sure to add 4K for a bunch of these games in time for the 2080 SUPER look.

Notably, this is the first game so far that puts the Vega 64 ahead of the original RTX 2060, so hopefully that bodes good things for Navi testing. With SUPER in particular, we’re continuing to see fair gains over the non-SUPERs, but the gains seen on the 2060 SUPER seem to be even more impressive than those on the 2070 SUPER. That’s all just SUPER.

Metro Exodus

Metro Exodus
Metro Exodus (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Metro Exodus (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Metro Exodus (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

“But can it run Metro Exodus?” should be a question anyone who enjoys this series asks, because like every other Metro title leading up to the latest, a secondary reason for this game’s existence is to punish unsuspecting graphics hardware. Even at 1080p, the minimums on the 2070 SUPER drop well below 60 FPS. Ignoring those harsh minimums, the averages are fair for the entire stack – again except for the RX 590.

It’s important to note that we’re using the Ultra profile for this testing, which is apparently quite aggressive. We may tone down the detail for the next round of testing, or go the manual route if we can score a save game. Either way, the game requires huge horsepower if you want to take advantage of all of its bells and whistles, and very few GPUs can even pull that off at 1080p!

Gaming: Monster Hunter World, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, The Division 2

Monster Hunter: World

Monster Hunter World
Monster Hunter World (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Monster Hunter World (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Monster Hunter World (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

Performance scaling doesn’t change-up much with Monster Hunter: World. At 1080p, every single one of these GPUs can run the game at very high detail with the high-res texture pack, with even the RX 590 keeping ahead of 60 FPS minimum. That GPU falls a bit too far behind at 1440p, while only NVIDIA’s SUPERs and the RTX 2070 manage to keep safely above 60 FPS. The Vega 64 and original RTX 2060 don’t fall too far behind.

Shadow of the Tomb Raider

Shadow of the Tomb Raider
Shadow of the Tomb Raider (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Shadow of the Tomb Raider (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Shadow of the Tomb Raider (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

We’re skipping minimums with this one, since some of what we saw made no sense, and we obviously need to refine how we test this game. Nonetheless, all of the cards deliver strong performance at up to 1440p, which even includes the RX 590. That’s not bad for a modern game that sports many graphical effects (including ray tracing, but that wasn’t tested here).

The Division 2

Tom Clancy's The Division 2
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

The Division 2 is an AMD’d partnered game, but NVIDIA’s GPUs perform exceptionally well with it. But, at top-end graphics settings, ultrawide does get a little iffy even for the RTX 2070 SUPER, peaking at 55 FPS. Thankfully, this game has a billion (give or take) graphics settings to tweak, so if you’re desperate for 60 FPS, it shouldn’t take much tweaking to get there.

Gaming: Total War: Three Kingdoms, CS: GO, Rainbow Six: Siege

Total War: Three Kingdoms

Total War Three Kingdoms
Total War Three Kingdoms (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Total War Three Kingdoms (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Total War Three Kingdoms (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

Three Kingdoms is the latest in the Total War franchise, and as we found out at Intel’s Odyssey event in Taiwan during Computex, the game’s developer focused a lot on eking as much performance out of people’s systems as possible. It’s meant to look great, and run great, and for the most part, that seems to be the case, with even Intel touting its gameplay on its integrated graphics.

With discrete cards, the graphics will obviously improve significantly, and for 1080p gaming, you don’t need a really high-end card to get great framerates. Even the Vega 64 hits (close to) 60 FPS at 1080p. After that point, though, it’s like some GPUs run into a wall. Neither of the Radeons are suitable with the chosen graphics settings, but like some of the other games in our suite, this one has many graphical knobs to turn.

Even the RTX 2070 SUPER cries a little bit at 3440×1440. For some, 47 FPS average might be suitable, but if not for you, a couple of changes in the settings will rectify that pretty quickly. Thankfully, the game’s built-in benchmark makes it easy to test out your tweaks.

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

CSGO Steam
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

Counter-Strike is a game we never thought we’d benchmark, for the simple fact that the frame rates go through the roof. But, that happens to be important to eSports gamers, and it’s easy to understand why. Ultimately, in competition, latency anywhere matters, whether it’s the lag between a host and a client over a network, or the lag from a mouse click to reaction on the screen.

144Hz is a typical goal for competitive gamers, but as evidenced above, it won’t be hard to take full advantage of 200Hz monitors in this game. 240Hz comes close, with some of the cards hitting 235 FPS. We’re hitting an obvious bottleneck somewhere, likely with the CPU, and since we’re already hitting a Turbo clock of 5GHz, 240Hz might have to wait to see improvement.

At 4K, the Vega 64 and RTX 2060 come close to 144 FPS, while the top three obliterate that mark. Even the RX 590 hits nearly 100 FPS at 4K, so if you’re a fan of this game, you can relish the fact that you won’t have to break the bank to get great performance.

Rainbow Six: Siege

Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

We weren’t able to exceed 240 FPS with CS: GO, but it happened with Siege, and that’s despite it being a more graphically-intensive game – as evidenced by the high-resolution graphs. All six of the tested graphics cards exceed 144 FPS at 1080p, and all but the RX 590 hit that at 1080p. At 4K, you’ll need one of the top three cards to hover around 100 FPS.

Synthetic: 3DMark, VRMark & Superposition

UL 3DMark

UL 3DMark Fire Strike (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
UL 3DMark Fire Strike (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
UL 3DMark Time Spy Extreme (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

The RTX 2070 SUPER struts its stuff well in all three of these UL benchmarks, placing well ahead of the rest of the lineup – including of course the GPU it’s replacing. Likewise, the 2060 SUPER sees a big uptick in performance over the RTX 2060, which is partly why NVIDIA is adding this as an additional SKU for $50 more, rather than replace the original 2060.

UL VRMark

Futuremark VRMark Cyan Room
UL VRMark (Cyan Room) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
UL VRMark (Blue Room) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

The more we look at these results, the more we know they’d look so much better with AMD’s Navi added in, as it’s going to give us a more reflective view of what you’re going to be able to buy soon. Fortunately, those results are coming super-soon.

Unigine Superposition

Unigine Superposition
Unigine Superposition (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Unigine Superposition (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

Wrapping things up, the 2070 SUPER once again exhibits some huge strengths over its predecessor, while the RX Vega 64 continues to put forth a valiant effort against the original RTX 2060. Ultimately, we’re seeing some serious strength from the green team – but competition is coming.

Final Thoughts

We admittedly bit off more than we could chew in recent weeks, the result of inefficiently tackling a number of test suite upgrades all at once. Working against us, we had to keep troubleshooting select games, and swapping out GPUs more than necessary due to game DRM. We’re happy to say that things have resolved themselves nicely, though we still regret that this particular review took days long to release than it really should have.

At this point, we have AMD’s Radeon Navi benchmarked and ready to publish results for, but we haven’t actually compiled those results yet to make sure we weren’t influenced by them in writing this conclusion. Our conclusion now is the same as it would have been days ago… that AMD has caused some disruption here. NVIDIA didn’t just pull SUPER out of a hat as a response to Navi. It’s undoubtedly been sitting in the wings. The actual timing itself to release is undeniably a way to jab AMD, and it is what it is. Companies sure do seem to have fun trading blows.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER & RTX 2070 SUPER

When we tested the original RTX 2060, we considered it the most attractive model of the entire RTX lineup, because for its price, it packed in all of the goods, and delivered a great gaming punch. The SUPER extends that, but becomes a bit more future-proof by bumping the framebuffer to 8GB. It would have been really SUPER to see the new 2060 priced the same, but alas, we apparently can’t have it all. At least the FE comes with a great-looking shroud, and not to mention a backplate.

We haven’t tackled overclocking on these cards yet, but out-of-the-box, the performance on both is really strong. It is quite nice to see that the RTX 2070 SUPER replaces the original, giving gamers who were eying that price point a nice boost to performance. The RTX 2060 SUPER makes for an excellent 1440p card, while the 2070 SUPER extends that to ultrawide, and inches into 4K territory.

As mentioned earlier, we unfortunately lacked RTX performance in this article due to running into too many software issues, but that will be rectified soon, along with our usual creator-type benchmarks. While our CPU and gaming GPU collection is largely up to date now, we need to start from scratch with workstation, so we plan to deliver that look later in the week.

From a value perspective, and ignoring AMD’s GPUs which are pending launch, NVIDIA’s SUPER GPUs offer a lot of value. If you need any sort of proof, just look at the fact that AMD dropped pricing for both cards ahead of their launch. The RX 5700 XT drops from $450 to $400, while the RX 5700 falls $30 to hit $349. A fuller picture will be seen once results can be published for Navi, coming “soon”. Stay tuned.

July 8 Addendum: Because this article was published so close to the release of AMD’s new Navi GPUs, it was impossible to draw up immediate conclusions given that we weren’t sure what AMD was bringing to the table. Well, we’ve now taken an in-depth look at team red’s latest offerings, and after now seeing a fuller picture, we believe the GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER, with all that it offers at $399, its worthy of an Editor’s Choice award. Likewise, AMD’s Radeon RX 5700 took the honor at the $349 slot, as it delivers great competitive performance and offers an additional 2GB on the framebuffer. We must reiterate: it is a great time to be looking at purchasing a new mid-range GPU.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER - Techgage Editor's Choice
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER

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