Latest News Posts

Social
Latest Forum Posts

Intel 335 Series 180GB SSD Review
Bookmark and Share

Intel 335 180GB SSD
Print
by Robert Tanner on March 18, 2013 in Solid-State Drives

Looking for a mainstream SSD but need help deciding which to choose? Is that $10 difference really worth it? Who’s got the most reliable SandForce based-SSD around? Why does Intel have so many SandForce SSDs anyway? All these questions and more are answered within!

Test System & Methodology

At Techgage, we strive to make sure our results are as accurate and real-world applicable as possible. We list most of the steps and processes involved in setting up and conducting our benchmarking process below, but in the interests of brevity we can’t mention every last detail. If there is any pertinent information that we’ve inadvertently omitted or you have any thoughts, suggestions, or critiques, then please feel free to email us or post directly in our forums. This site exists for readers like you and we value your input.

The table below lists the hardware used in our current storage-testing machine, which remains unchanged throughout all of our testing, with the obvious exception of the storage device. Each drive used for the sake of comparison is also listed here.

  Techgage Solid-State Drive Test System
Processor Intel Core i7-2600 – 3.80GHz (Locked) Quad-Core
Motherboard ASUS P8P67 Deluxe
Memory 4GB Kingston DDR3-2133
Graphics AMD Radeon HD 5770
Storage Hitachi 7200RPM 2TB Hard Drive
Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB
Crucial m4 256GB
Intel 335 Series 180GB
Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB
Kingston SSDNow V300 240GB
OCZ Vector 256GB
OCZ Vertex 4 256GB
Power Supply Antec NeoHE 550W
Cooling Noctua DH-14
Et cetera Dell 2407WFP (1920×1200)
Lite-on DVD-RW
Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64-bit

Our Windows 7 Desktop for SSD Testing

When preparing our SSD testbed for benchmarking we follow these guidelines:

General Guidelines

  • The Core i7-2600 processor is turbo-locked at 3.5GHz for result consistency.
  • No power-saving options are enabled in the motherboard’s EFI.
  • AHCI is enabled in the motherboard’s EFI for best performance.
  • Only the Intel 6Gb/s port controller is used for test drives.
  • Only cold boots are utilized; for the purposes of our testing a boot is defined as the moment the power button is depressed to the moment the last systray icon and program has fully loaded after reaching the Windows 7 desktop. Auto-login is enabled.

Windows 7 Optimizations

  • User Account Control (UAC) is disabled.
  • The OS is kept clean; no scrap files are left in between runs.
  • Windows Update and OS power-saving settings are disabled.

For our new Sandy Bridge storage testbed we have migrated to using test images for our drives. All drives are imaged with the cloned test image to ensure all drivers, programs, and settings remain identical for testing purposes. We feel disk cloning software and SSD controller technology has matured to the point where potential issues such as non-aligned sectors are no longer a potential issue.

For testing, we run all tests five times dropping the highest and lowest results, then take the average of the middle three. And who said that college statistics class wouldn’t prove useful? If any anomalous results are seen the test will be run again. Given the complexities of modern computers, and especially today’s operating systems and the software that runs on them, we feel this provides the most accurate results possible.

Finally, we are seeking to constantly improve and expand upon our SSD testing methodology. We are always actively seeking real-world workload scenarios that are bottlenecked by hard drives, so if you have any suggestions whatsoever or there is a program you would like to see included in our SSD content, then please drop by our forums and let us know! We are always looking to expand our SSD benchmarks and provide more useful and real-world results, and not just synthetic numbers.


  • johndoe

    This is a decent drive but it comes with old 25nm Intel flash. The new revision of Vertex 3 comes with Intel 20nm MLC, which improves performance, reduces power consumption and increases reliability.

    • Kougar

      The only difference between the 335 and the 330 is in fact the NAND flash. The Intel 335 Series does use Intel’s 20nm MLC flash.

      • johndoe

        When you’re buying the drive off the shelf, you don’t know whether it’ll have 20nm or 25nm Intel ONFI MLC.

        It’s said that the drive comes with 20nm but that is NOT clear.

        You have absolutely no guarantee that ALL drives or YOUR drive will come with 20nm flash.

        That said, if you want a REALLY, really good SSD, then I got a Solidata X7 for sale.

        Heh.

Advertisement