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Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB Enterprise Hard Drive Review
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by Rob Williams on February 18, 2013 in Hard Drives

We took a look at both of WD’s 4TB hard drive options in the past month, so it’s a great time to get some Seagate action going. The Constellation ES.3 competes with WD’s RE in the enterprise space, but it brings an interesting feature to the table: a 128MB cache. So let’s give the the drive a good test and see if it can topple the RE drive we raved over.

Synthetic: AIDA64 2.70

Similar to HD Tune, AIDA64′s built-in disk benchmarker is one of the easiest to run. The developer also keeps up on top of architectural trends so that you feel confident that the algorithms don’t get much better than this. This spreads beyond the storage benchmark, as AIDA64′s system stress-testers is one of the best, if not the best, out there – thanks to it being able to take full advantage of any given CPU architecture.

For our testing, we run the Linear Read and Random Write tests. Because AIDA64 by default automatically chooses a cluster size (which changes at random), we force it to use 64KB for our testing.

AIDA64 2.30

Not one to break from tradition, AIDA places Seagate’s ES.3 drive ahead of WD’s RE, though the RE managed to deliver a far more attractive buffered result – strange, given the Seagate has more cache.

Though the ES.3 drive “wins” this battle against the RE drive, both come out as equals as far as I’m concerned. Nothing can remotely touch WD’s VelociRaptor where mechanical latancies are concerned – at least on the consumer side.


  • JD Kane

    As someone who has a file server array at home, articles on drives like this (and its market competition) are very interesting. Hopefully TechGage will continue to cover this market segment as it hopefully continues to grow. I’ll surely be needing to change my file server’s drives, especially with a view towards expanding its storage capacity.

  • Igor Mendelev

    It would have been great if you also test different capacities (for example, 1TB and 2TB) of the same drive to see how that’ll impact performance. 2TB version also is priced very similar to 1TB Velociraptor – which makes that even more interesting.

    • http://www.facebook.com/deathspawner Rob Williams

      If I can procure a drive like that, I’ll update the graphs. Will touch base with Seagate.