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EVGA GeForce GTX 285 SSC Edition
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by Rob Williams on March 1, 2009 in NVIDIA-Based GPU

When NVIDIA released their GTX 285 card last month, it became the fastest single-GPU card on the market, and that fact still remains. But with our insatiable appetite for more performance, we can’t help but be curious as to how the cards perform when overclocked. So let’s check that out, with the help of EVGA’s SSC Edition.

Call of Duty: World at War

While some popular game franchises are struggling to keep themselves healthy, Call of Duty doesn’t have much to worry about. This is Treyarch’s third go at a game in the series, and a first for one that’s featured on the PC. All worries leading up to this title were all for naught, though, as Treyarch delivered on all promises.

To help keep things fresh, CoD: World at War focuses on battles not exhaustively explored in previous WWII-inspired games. These include battles which take place in the Pacific region, Russia and Berlin, and variety is definitely something this game pulls off well, so it’s unlikely you’ll be off your toes until the end of the game.

For our testing, we use a level called “Relentless”, as it’s easily one of the most intensive levels in the game. It features tanks, a large forest environment and even a few explosions. This level depicts the Battle of Peleliu, where American soldiers advance to capture an airstrip from the Japanese. It’s a level that’s both exciting to play and one that can bring even high-end systems to their knees.

We’re off to a great start here, with noticeable performance increases over both the reference GTX 285 and also Zotac’s pre-overclocked AMP! edition card. The differences are still rather small and unnoticeable in regular gameplay, however, and that’s to be expected. In our 2560×1600 test, the performance shown against the GTX 295 is quite interesting. The GTX 285 SSC performs about 33% less, but still offers just enough FPS to have completely smooth gameplay at the game’s max settings. Greater differences may be seen if CoD allowed higher anti-aliasing modes, but that’s not the case (higher modes can’t even be forced).

Graphics Card
Best Playable
Avg. FPS
NVIDIA GTX 295 1792MB x 2
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 8xAA
90.283 FPS
NVIDIA GTX 285 1GB x 2
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 8xAA
63.401 FPS
Zotac GTX 295 1792MB
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 8xAA
52.461 FPS
Palit HD 4870 X2 2GB
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 8xAA
37.825 FPS
EVGA GTX 285 1GB SSC Edition
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
45.866 FPS
Zotac GTX 285 1GB AMP!
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
43.711 FPS
NVIDIA GTX 285 1GB
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
41.510 FPS
Palit GTX 280 1GB
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
38.192 FPS
XFX GTX 260/216 896MB
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 4xAA
32.723 FPS
Diamond HD 4870 1GB
2560×1600 – Max Detail, 0xAA
30.372 FPS
Sapphire HD 4830 512MB
1920×1200 – Max Detail, 0xAA
40.157 FPS
Sapphire HD 4670 512MB
1920×1200 – Max Detail, 0xAA
28.101 FPS

Even the reference GTX 285 is beefy enough to allow maximum detail settings at 2560×1600, so basically, the faster your GTX 285, the slightly higher the average FPS. It’s a good feeling to be able to totally max out a game and still have absolutely smooth gameplay.