NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 2060 & 2070 SUPER At 1080p, 1440p & Ultrawide

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER Thumb
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by Rob Williams on July 6, 2019 in Graphics & Displays

The first Turing GeForce cards released almost ten months ago, so it’s time for an upgrade – perhaps even a “SUPER” one? With a new title to hit the GeForce line, we’re getting just that with updated RTX 2060 and 2070s, and promises of an updated 2080 coming SUPER soon. Let’s see what the first new cards are made of.

Gaming: Total War: Three Kingdoms, CS: GO, Rainbow Six: Siege

Total War: Three Kingdoms

Total War Three Kingdoms
Total War Three Kingdoms (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Total War Three Kingdoms (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Total War Three Kingdoms (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

Three Kingdoms is the latest in the Total War franchise, and as we found out at Intel’s Odyssey event in Taiwan during Computex, the game’s developer focused a lot on eking as much performance out of people’s systems as possible. It’s meant to look great, and run great, and for the most part, that seems to be the case, with even Intel touting its gameplay on its integrated graphics.

With discrete cards, the graphics will obviously improve significantly, and for 1080p gaming, you don’t need a really high-end card to get great framerates. Even the Vega 64 hits (close to) 60 FPS at 1080p. After that point, though, it’s like some GPUs run into a wall. Neither of the Radeons are suitable with the chosen graphics settings, but like some of the other games in our suite, this one has many graphical knobs to turn.

Even the RTX 2070 SUPER cries a little bit at 3440×1440. For some, 47 FPS average might be suitable, but if not for you, a couple of changes in the settings will rectify that pretty quickly. Thankfully, the game’s built-in benchmark makes it easy to test out your tweaks.

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

CSGO Steam
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

Counter-Strike is a game we never thought we’d benchmark, for the simple fact that the frame rates go through the roof. But, that happens to be important to eSports gamers, and it’s easy to understand why. Ultimately, in competition, latency anywhere matters, whether it’s the lag between a host and a client over a network, or the lag from a mouse click to reaction on the screen.

144Hz is a typical goal for competitive gamers, but as evidenced above, it won’t be hard to take full advantage of 200Hz monitors in this game. 240Hz comes close, with some of the cards hitting 235 FPS. We’re hitting an obvious bottleneck somewhere, likely with the CPU, and since we’re already hitting a Turbo clock of 5GHz, 240Hz might have to wait to see improvement.

At 4K, the Vega 64 and RTX 2060 come close to 144 FPS, while the top three obliterate that mark. Even the RX 590 hits nearly 100 FPS at 4K, so if you’re a fan of this game, you can relish the fact that you won’t have to break the bank to get great performance.

Rainbow Six: Siege

Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (1080p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (1440p) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (4K) - NVIDIA RTX SUPER 2060 and 2070 Performance

We weren’t able to exceed 240 FPS with CS: GO, but it happened with Siege, and that’s despite it being a more graphically-intensive game – as evidenced by the high-resolution graphs. All six of the tested graphics cards exceed 144 FPS at 1080p, and all but the RX 590 hit that at 1080p. At 4K, you’ll need one of the top three cards to hover around 100 FPS.

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Rob Williams

Rob founded Techgage in 2005 to be an 'Advocate of the consumer', focusing on fair reviews and keeping people apprised of news in the tech world. Catering to both enthusiasts and businesses alike; from desktop gaming to professional workstations, and all the supporting software.

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