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AMD Radeon R9 270X Graphics Card Review
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AMD Radeon 270X
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by Rob Williams on October 15, 2013 in AMD-Based GPU, Video Cards

We took AMD’s $300 Radeon R9 280X for a spin last week and were left quite impressed overall with the results, versus the GTX 760. Will we get the same sort of reaction with the company’s Radeon R9 270X? With the help of NVIDIA’s ~$175 GeForce GTX 660, we’re going to find that out.

Game Tests: Crysis 3, GRID 2

When the original Crysis dropped in late 2007, it took no time at all for pundits to coin the phrase, “Can it run Crysis?“, almost to the point of self-parody. At the time, the game couldn’t have its graphics detail maxed-out on even top-of-the-line PCs, and in reality, that’s a great thing. I’d imagine few are opposed to knowing that a game could actually look better down the road as our PCs grow into them. As the series continued, Crytek knew it had a legend to live up to, and fortunately, Crysis 3 (our review) lives up to the original’s legacy.

Crysis 3 - 1920x1080 Single Monitor
1920×1080 (1 Monitor)

Crysis 3 - 5760x1080 Triple Monitor
5760×1080 (3×1 Monitors)

Manual Run-through: There’s no particular level in Crysis 3 that I could establish was “better” for benchmarking than another, but I settled on “Red Star Rising” based on the fact that I could perform a run-through with no chance of dying (a great thing in a challenging game like this one). The level starts us in a derelict building, where I traverse broken pipe to make it over to one rooftop and then another. I eventually hit the ground after taking advantage of a zipline, and make my way down to a river, where I scurry past a number of enemies to the end spot beneath a building.

AMD Radeon R9 280X - Crysis 3 (1920x1080)

AMD Radeon R9 280X - Crysis 3 (2560x1440)

AMD Radeon R9 280X - Crysis 3 (4800x900)

On the last page, we saw NVIDIA’s GTX 660 and AMD’s new R9 270X go head-to-head in BioShock Infinite, and with Crysis 3, we see the exact same thing. Will it become a trend? We’ll soon see.

GRID 2

For those who appreciate racing games that are neither too realistic nor too arcade-like, there’s GRID. In GRID 2 (review), the ultimate goal is to build a racing empire, starting from square one. Unlike most racing titles that have some sort of career, the goal here isn’t to earn cash, but fans. Whether you’re racing around Abu Dhabi’s Yas Marina or tearing through a gorgeous Cote d’Azur coastline, your goal is simple: To impress.

GRID 2 - 1920x1080 Single Monitor
1920×1080 (1 Monitor)

GRID 2 - 5760x1080 Triple Monitor
5760×1080 (3×1 Monitors)

Manual Run-through: The track chosen for my benchmarking is Miami (Ocean Drive). It’s a simple track overall, which is one of the reasons I chose it, and also the reason I choose to do just a single lap (I crash, often, and that affects both the results and my patience). Unlike most games in the suite which I test twice over (save for an oddity in the results), I race this one lap three times over.

AMD Radeon R9 280X - GRID 2 (1920x1080)

AMD Radeon R9 280X - GRID 2 (2560x1440)

AMD Radeon R9 280X - GRID 2 (4800x900)

AMD’s R9 270X has made some good ground here, performing noticeably better than the GTX 660 in the bottom two resolutions. Strangely enough, the 270X matched the 280X @ 1440p, but the 280X far outpaced in our multi-monitor resolution. The 270X sure is unpredictable so far.


  • Hubert J Farnsworth

    Whats with the massive frame drops in Metro ? Is it that graphics hungry?

    • http://techgage.com/ Rob Williams

      I’d have to check the duration charts when I get back from a quick trip, but I believe that’s one part of this timedemo with major explosions, and that’s where the slowdown occurs.