AMD’s Radeon RX 5700 & RX 5700 XT At 1080p, 1440p & Ultrawide

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by Rob Williams on July 8, 2019 in Graphics & Displays

Mid-range gamers who are overdue for an upgrade might want to pay attention to the latest options to just hit the market. Following NVIDIA’s launch of GeForce SUPER last week, AMD is now taking the veil off of its Navi-codenamed GPUs, based on the brand-new RNDA architecture. With three resolutions on tap, let’s explore the performance of the $349 RX 5700 and $399 RX 5700 XT.

Gaming: Total War: Three Kingdoms, CS: GO, Rainbow Six: Siege

Total War: Three Kingdoms

Total War Three Kingdoms
Total War Three Kingdoms (1080p) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance
Total War Three Kingdoms (1440p) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance
Total War Three Kingdoms (3440x1440 Ultrawide) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance

Three Kingdoms becomes one of the couple of games in this suite that both RTX 2070s run away with performance in. The 5700 XT falls behind the RTX 2060 SUPER, but thankfully not to a considerable degree.

A great thing about pretty much any Total War game is that you are given the opportunity to tweak many graphics settings so that you can fine-tune performance and IQ just to your liking. At 1440p and the given high-end settings, only the RTX 2070 SUPER proves truly worthy, while all of them fall well short of 60 FPS at the ultrawide resolution.

If you want to experience Three Kingdoms in its highest-detail glory at above 1440p, you will need beefier GPUs than those seen here. Luckily the RTX 2080 SUPER is just around the corner then, right? To be clear though, it’s not like reducing a few settings to hit 60 FPS is going to make a severe detriment to the overall IQ. You will have to choose your battles in Three Kingdoms¬†wisely, even those with graphics settings.

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

CSGO Steam
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (1080p) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (1440p) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance
Counter-Strike Global Offensive (4K) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance

As covered originally in our look at NVIDIA’s SUPER cards, CS: GO is not a game we ever expected to test, but with eSports popularity still growing at an incredible rate, so too are higher frame counts – the kind that make 60 FPS seem really limited. While it can be argued that there’s a point when there’s “enough” frames each second, monitors offering up to 240Hz panels make it really tempting to find games that can hit the appropriate frame rate.

In our look at SUPER, we found it interesting that we couldn’t inch past the 235 FPS mark, which gave an impression of a CPU bottleneck. Well, AMD’s RX 5700 XT managed to get past that barrier, but not by much, ending up at 238 FPS. As we’ll see in a minute, greater than 238 FPS in general is definitely possible in competitive games.

At 4K, every single GPU listed here will deliver suitable performance, with only the RX 590 being knocked out if you are going after a 144Hz panel. As always, settings can be changed to inch your FPS up higher if you are desperate for more frames.

Rainbow Six: Siege

Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (1080p) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (1440p) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege (4K) - AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 Performance

Even at max detail, every single one of the listed GPUs can eat through Siege. That even includes the lowly RX 590, which still manages to go well beyond 144 FPS at 1080p. Those adamant about 144 FPS can rule out a GPU like the RX 590, but consider anything Vega 64 onward.

Actual hard work starts to hit these GPUs at 4K, a resolution that will still see ~60 FPS performance on even the lowest-end GPU here. Across the three resolutions, AMD and NVIDIA went back and forth on strengths, so ultimately, they are fairly equal overall.

Rob Williams

Rob founded Techgage in 2005 to be an 'Advocate of the consumer', focusing on fair reviews and keeping people apprised of news in the tech world. Catering to both enthusiasts and businesses alike; from desktop gaming to professional workstations, and all the supporting software.

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