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Mid-2021 GPU Rendering Performance: Arnold, Blender, KeyShot, LuxCoreRender, Octane, Radeon ProRender, Redshift & V-Ray

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti - Angle Shot

Date: June 25, 2021
Author(s): Rob Williams

It’s been six months since we’ve last taken an in-depth look at GPU rendering performance, and with NVIDIA having just released two new GPUs, we felt now was a great time to get up-to-date. With AMD’s and NVIDIA’s current-get stack in-hand, along with a few legends of the past, we’re going to investigate rendering performance in Blender, Octane, Redshift, V-Ray, and more.



Introduction; Blender, Radeon ProRender & LuxCoreRender Performance

It’s been quite a while since we’ve last taken a deep-dive look at GPU rendering performance, so with NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 3080 Ti and 3070 Ti having been recently released, now seems like a good time to get caught up. If you’re after gaming performance, we’ve already taken care of that, for both ultrawide and 4K resolutions.

This article will include rendering performance for eight renderers, three of which will run on Radeon. That includes Blender, Radeon ProRender (used in Blender), as well as LuxCoreRender. For CUDA/OptiX-only renderers, we’re going to tackle (on the next page) Arnold, KeyShot, Redshift, Octane, and V-Ray.

Professional GPUs such as NVIDIA’s Quadro (or not-so-Quadro A-series RTX cards) and AMD’s Radeon Pro series are not included in these render-focused tests, since they perform similarly in rendering as the gaming counterparts. Pro cards are particularly special for CAD modeling and viewport-heavy workloads, and a number of such tests can be found in another article.

We’re not aware of Arnold, KeyShot, or V-Ray having any plans to support Radeon in the future, but both Redshift and Octane currently support Radeon on Apple platforms only. Fortunately, both companies plan to support Radeon in Windows at some point, and when the trigger is pulled, it’s going to be a great day. It’s admittedly a little annoying to have to leave Radeon out of so many tests here, but in the words of Ray LaFleur, that’s just the way she goes.

For this article, we wanted to make a point to include robust generational performance information, so that you can see how your old GPU may compete against the latest and greatest. In addition to the entire fleet of current-gen gaming GPUs being tested, we’ve also included the RTX 2080 Ti (Turing) and GTX 1080 Ti (Pascal) for NVIDIA, as well as RX 5700 XT (RDNA), VII (Vega), and RX 590 (Polaris) for AMD. Each of those GPUs were the top-end part for their respective architecture (and generation).

Here’s AMD’s current-gen lineup:

AMD’s Radeon Creator & Gaming GPU Lineup
Cores Boost MHz Peak FP32 Memory Bandwidth TDP Price
RX 6900 XT 5,120 2,250 23 TFLOPS 16 GB 1 512 GB/s 300W $999
RX 6800 XT 4,608 2,250 20.7 TFLOPS 16 GB 1 512 GB/s 300W $649
RX 6800 3,840 2,105 16.2 TFLOPS 16 GB 1 512 GB/s 250W $579
RX 6700 XT 2,560 2,581 13.2 TFLOPS 12 GB 1 384 GB/s 230W $479
Notes 1 GDDR6
Architecture: RX 6000 = RDNA2

AMD doesn’t currently offer “low-end” parts for its RDNA2-based lineup, although due to current market conditions, the company hasn’t exactly suffered for it. The most recent release is the RX 6700 XT, starting at $479 SRP. As you’ll see in the table below, NVIDIA wins on the memory bandwidth front, but all of these current-gen Radeons offer more memory than the majority of NVIDIA’s current-gen GeForces.

And speaking of:

NVIDIA’s GeForce Creator & Gaming GPU Lineup
Cores Boost MHz Peak FP32 Memory Bandwidth TDP SRP
RTX 3090 10,496 1,700 35.6 TFLOPS 24GB 1 936 GB/s 350W $1,499
RTX 3080 Ti 10,240 1,670 34.1 TFLOPS 12GB 1 912 GB/s 350W $1,199
RTX 3080 8,704 1,710 29.7 TFLOPS 10GB 1 760 GB/s 320W $699
RTX 3070 Ti 6,144 1,770 21.7 TFLOPS 8GB 1 608 GB/s 290W $599
RTX 3070 5,888 1,730 20.4 TFLOPS 8GB 2 448 GB/s 220W $499
RTX 3060 Ti 4,864 1,670 16.2 TFLOPS 8GB 2 448 GB/s 200W $399
RTX 3060 3,584 1,780 12.7 TFLOPS 12GB 2 360 GB/s 170W $329
Notes 1 GDDR6X; 2 GDDR6
RTX 3000 = Ampere

When it comes to “ultimate” creator cards, it’s hard to compete with NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 3090. As we’ll see in multiple tests throughout this article, NVIDIA’s RT cores can make a big difference with rendering performance, and for that reason, AMD might actually feel safe not being supported by most of our tested renderers right now.

Because creator workloads generally thrive with lots of memory, GPUs offering 8GB should be considered a bare minimum, because even if it’s not limiting to you today, it probably will become so over the life of the card. That rationale might make the RTX 3060, with its 12GB frame buffer, look attractive, but the performance results will be the ultimate judge of that.

If you have a choice between a lower-end RTX 3000 series card, or the RTX 2080 Ti with 11GB buffer, you’re likely to benefit more from the latter, even though the Ampere generation boosts rendering performance even further. Again, this is something the many test results in this article can highlight.

On that note, here’s an overview of the PC used in testing for this article:

Techgage Workstation Test System
Processor AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X (32-core; 3.7GHz)
Motherboard ASUS Zenith II Extreme Alpha (EFI: 1402 01/15/2021)
Memory Corsair Dominator (CMT64GX4M4Z4Z3600C16)
4x16GB; DDR4-3200 16-18-18
AMD Graphics AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT (16GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT (16GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6800 (16GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT (12GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT (8GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
AMD Radeon VII (16GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
AMD Radeon RX 590 (8GB; Adrenalin 21.5.2)
NVIDIA Graphics NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 (24GB; GeForce 462.59)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti (12GB; GeForce 466.54)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 (10GB; GeForce 462.59)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti (8GB; GeForce 466.61)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 (8GB; GeForce 462.59)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti (8GB; GeForce 462.59)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 (12GB; GeForce 462.59)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (11GB; GeForce 462.59)
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB; GeForce 462.59)
Audio Onboard
Storage AMD OS: Samsung 500GB SSD (SATA)
NVIDIA OS: Samsung 500GB SSD (SATA)
Power Supply Corsair 80 Plus Gold AX1200
Chassis NZXT H710i Mid-Tower
Cooling NZXT Kraken X63 AIO Liquid Cooler
Et cetera Windows 10 Pro build 19043.1023 (21H1)
All product links in this table are affiliated, and help support our work.
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800 As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6800
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon VII As tested configuration: AMD Radeon VII
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon VII
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon VII
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 590 As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 590
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 590
As tested configuration: AMD Radeon RX 590
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti
As tested configuration: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

There are a couple of exceptions to the test platform above, as a result of our choosing to include LuxCoreRender and Radeon ProRender after the other testing was completed. For some reason, LuxMark crashed each and every time on our Threadripper rig, even on a fresh Windows install. So, to save having to swap GPUs twice as many times, we simply completed both the LuxCoreRender and RPR tests on our AMD Ryzen 9 5950X platform instead, which was equipped with the same memory configuration.

All of our testing is completed using the latest versions of: Windows (10, 21H1), AMD and NVIDIA graphics drivers, and the software tested. Two exceptions for the latter: we can’t test LuxMark 4.0 alpha1, as we’ve yet to get it successfully compiled, and Radeon ProRender has a beta for Blender 2.93 available, but after testing it, we’re keen on waiting for the stable version instead. More on that later.

Here are some other general guidelines we follow:

Blender 2.93

Considering that we have a dedicated Blender 2.93 performance deep-dive article planned, it feels odd to kick off this article with it. However, Blender has become a truly de facto point of reference for rendering, one that both AMD and NVIDIA heavily rely-upon, so for that reason it makes good sense to start there.

Blender 2.93 - Cycles GPU Render Performance (BMW) (June 2021)
Blender 2.93 - Cycles GPU Render Performance (Classroom) (June 2021)

Something that becomes immediately obvious from the results above is that the Radeon RX 590 is really lacking in performance when compared to the rest of the lineup. Its performance is so much worse than the other bottom cards, in fact, that we wondered if we should just chop it off, since it ends up making the rest of the scaling look less impressive than it actually is. For the sake of painting a really clear picture of generational performance improvements, however, we decided to leave it in.

Both the BMW and Classroom projects are getting up there in age, but they’re still incredibly scalable and representative of current performance. They also behave quite differently from one another. In the simpler BMW test, NVIDIA GPUs reign supreme; in the Classroom test, AMD historically performs really well, and no exception has been made here. It’s quite something to see a GPU like the RX 6900 XT beat out the RTX 3090 ever-so-slightly in the Classroom test, but take twice as long in the BMW one. And that’s before OptiX is introduced. Here’s that angle:

Blender 2.93 - Cycles OptiX Render Performance (Classroom) (June 2021)

Sticking to the Classroom scene, enabling OptiX effectively halves the amount of time it takes to render a frame, which makes AMD’s strengths in the straight-forward CUDA vs. OpenCL battle seem less impressive. While AMD’s RDNA2 improved upon Radeon’s ray tracing capabilities quite well, it’s still been unable to compete with the boost provided by the RTX series’ dedicated ray tracing cores.

Fortunately for AMD, only Cycles currently benefits from RT cores. EEVEE doesn’t, so let’s check that out next:

Blender 2.93 - Eevee GPU Render Performance (Mr. Elephant) (June 2021)

After we compiled our Blender 2.93 EEVEE results, we immediately had to reinstall every single tested GPU and test 2.92 again with the same graphics driver. We knew that EEVEE performance improvements came with 2.93, but we didn’t realize they would represent a literal halving of each GPU’s render times. Blender’s developers have worked some real magic here. The best part? This all comes in addition to a fine-tuning of the end result. Side-by-side, there are super slight differences between versions, but the ultimate nod goes to 2.93.

Both AMD and NVIDIA have gained handsomely here, although NVIDIA seems to get a super slight advantage overall. For example, with 2.92, the RTX 3070 placed just behind the RX 6900 XT, whereas it now manages to place ahead. So, even though EEVEE doesn’t support NVIDIA’s RT cores, it still has the overall advantage. When EEVEE switches over to Vulkan at some point in the future, we’ll likely see another big reshuffle, since Vulkan RT could lead to yet more performance, and added ray tracing elements to this raster-based engine.

Rendering is just one part of the Blender equation; viewport performance also matters, so let’s check that out:

Blender 2.93 - 4K Material Preview Viewport Performance (Racing Car) (June 2021)

Using the complex Racing Car scene from Blender’s 2.77 release, we can see that performance hasn’t changed too much from what we saw with our 2.92 testing. Scaling is effectively the same, although some numbers changed by one or two FPS. Yet again, AMD’s GPUs for some reason fall to the bottom of the chart, with even the lowly RTX 3060 edging out the RX 6900 XT.

This particular scene is really complex, so we’d naturally expect it to be grueling on all GPUs, but we really do wish we saw better performance out of the Radeon camp this go-around. Once we post our fuller Blender 2.93 deep-dive, you’ll see that simpler scenes will naturally run better, but it’s still hard to ignore the performance deltas between both AMD and NVIDIA here. We can even see similar behavior with both the Solid and Wireframe modes:

Blender 2.93 - 4K Solid Viewport Performance (Racing Car) (June 2021)
Blender 2.93 - 4K Wireframe Viewport Performance (Racing Car) (June 2021)

Our test platform uses a 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper, which means that simpler graphics workloads like those above are largely going to look the same at the top (especially at resolutions lower than 4K). Even still, we see a clear separation between AMD and NVIDIA. The RTX 3060 in particular noticeably lags behind the other GeForces (something we retested to sanity check).

On that note, it’s time to use Blender once again for another kind of rendering test, one involving AMD’s own Radeon ProRender:

AMD Radeon ProRender 3.1

AMD Radeon ProRender Performance - Blender BMW Scene (June 2021)
AMD Radeon ProRender Performance - Blender Classroom Scene (June 2021)
AMD Radeon ProRender Performance - Blender Pavillion Scene (June 2021)

With Radeon ProRender, scaling across all three of these projects is pretty similar, with the older GPUs, including GTX 1080 Ti, sinking to the bottom of the pile in a significant way. Despite being a Radeon-branded renderer, NVIDIA’s current-gen GPUs outpace AMD’s latest and greatest a wee bit overall, although the RTX 3080 and RX 6900 XT could be considered similar.

What’s interesting about these results is how differently the Classroom project scales in RPR vs. Cycles. AMD’s top-end GPUs soared to the top of this respective chart with Cycles, but fails to topple NVIDIA the same way with ProRender.

As lightly mentioned earlier, the current stable version of Radeon ProRender for Blender doesn’t support 2.93, due to Python changes. There is a beta available, which we gave some hands-on testing. What we found was that performance was worse in almost every case, though it was more significant in Classroom than the others. The end render result did look a little bit better in each case, although not to the level you’d expect given the increased rendering times.

After testing out a few GPUs with this beta, we decided to just stick with the stable version, and retest later once the 2.93-compatible version goes final, because we believe it will likely bundle performance improvements.

We will note that Radeon ProRender is a valuable tool if you’re an Apple user, since RPR can make use of the Metal API used by macOS, and will provide you with a GPU performance boost that you would otherwise have to get from a commercial render engine.

LuxCoreRender 2.2

LuxMark Performance - Food OpenCL Score (June 2021)
LuxMark Performance - Hall Bench OpenCL Score (June 2021)

The latest precompiled binary for LuxMark represents the 2.2 version of LuxCoreRender, and because 2.5 is effectively available now, that means a completely up-to-date LuxMark may show different results (and hopefully not crash every single time on our Threadripper machine). Nonetheless, we still see some great scaling here, with Radeons finally holding their own against the GeForces. Yet again, NVIDIA has an edge overall, but not to a truly significant degree.

This concludes our look at the three renderers we were able to run on both GeForce and Radeon GPUs. On the next page, we’ll dive into the CUDA/OptiX-specific renderers. In case you care about power consumption, we’ll also be tackling that.

Octane, V-Ray, Redshift, Arnold & KeyShot Performance; Power Consumption

OTOY OctaneRender 2020

OTOY OctaneRender - God Rays RTX On and Off (June 2021)
OTOY OctaneRender - Plants RTX On and Off (June 2021)

OctaneRender was one of the first NVIDIA-focused renderers that implemented OptiX ray tracing acceleration, and the company is clearly fond of it, considering there’s a special menu option for testing RTX on and off with any scene you have loaded. Across both of these projects, it’s clear that OptiX (or “RTX”) can dramatically improve rendering performance, to an even greater degree than most of the others. We’re talking performance that’s more than doubled.

The GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is still a great GPU in its own right, but we feel that gamers would get more use out of it than creators today, because the current crop of NVIDIA cards are simply unmatched. That’s even without RT acceleration; even the RTX 3060 proves close to 50% more competent than the GTX 1080 Ti. But, turn RTX on, and that $329 (SRP) GPU turns into a screamer.

Fortunately, the standalone OctaneBench benchmark backs up our real-world tests pretty well:

OTOY OctaneBench 2020 (June 2021)

As NVIDIA’s Jensen Huang loves to say, the “more you buy, the more you save”. In Octane’s case, the GPU you choose really does make an incredible difference to how many frames you can render in a given amount of time. Naturally, if your budget allows, adding multiple GPUs will accelerate the rendering further. Isn’t that just what you want to hear during ongoing chip shortages?

Chaos V-Ray 5

Chaos V-Ray 5 CUDA Performance - Flowers Render (June 2021)

With our first V-Ray render, using CUDA exclusively, we’re seeing great scaling all around, and more proof that the GTX 1080 Ti is getting up there in age. We can also see that the 3080 Ti, despite costing hundreds less than the RTX 3090, effectively delivers the same performance. That even carries over to OptiX testing:

Chaos V-Ray 5 RTX Performance - Flowers Render (June 2021)

It’s interesting that the gains seen from OptiX in V-Ray are not quite as distinct as they are in a renderer like Octane. That said, you’ll definitely want to keep the RTX option enabled, since any performance improvement is going to be appreciated. Because OptiX doesn’t make quite as large a difference in V-Ray as some others, heterogeneous rendering stands to benefit even more – if you have a monster CPU:

Chaos V-Ray 5 CPU and GPU Performance - Flowers Render (June 2021)

Using a CPU as large as the Ryzen Threadripper 3970X might not be the best idea for a test like this, because it’s obviously not representative of a standard workstation choice. However, it still shows that big CPUs can in fact deliver a great benefit. With the 3970X and GTX 1080 Ti tag-teaming, we see render times on par with the RTX 3070 Ti running OptiX.

If you’re a creator, you’ll always want the latest GPU can get your hands on, but it’s still nice to see the CPU contributing so much here, especially if you happen to have a many-core CPU in your own rig, and want to better utilize it.

Let’s see what the standalone V-Ray benchmark has to say:

Chaos V-Ray 5 Benchmark - CUDA Score (June 2021)
Chaos V-Ray 5 Benchmark - RTX Score (June 2021)

Ultimately, the V-Ray benchmark doesn’t scale identically to our real-world project, but that’s to be expected, since no two projects are generally going to scale exactly the same. Still, in some regards, the GTX 1080 Ti falls even further behind the rest in our real-world tests than it does when it’s summed up as a score with this dedicated benchmark. One thing the benchmark definitely agrees on is the fact that the RTX 3080 Ti and RTX 3090 perform effectively the same – they just have different frame buffer sizes.

Maxon Redshift 3

Maxon Redshift 3 CUDA and RTX Render Performance - Radio Render (June 2021)
Maxon Redshift 3 CUDA and RTX Render Performance - Ages of Vultures Render (June 2021)

We’ve said before that two different projects are very unlikely to scale the same way in performance charts, and the two projects used here prove that in spades. With our simpler Radio project, enabling OptiX makes an enormous difference, while the gain in Age of Vultures is more mild. If you’re a Redshift user stuck with GTX 1080 Ti, you should feel happy about the performance you’re getting, although it will still be hard to ignore the newer GPUs that support RT acceleration.

There are a couple of specific results that stand out to us here. In the Radio project, the RTX 2080 Ti somehow falls behind the RTX 3060 when using OptiX, but the roles reverse with the Age of Vultures scene. Further, enabling OptiX almost mimics a GPU upgrade. The RTX 3060, with OptiX enabled, closely matches the performance of the RTX 3070 Ti using CUDA.

Here’s the take from the standalone benchmark, using the same 3.0.45 version:

Maxon Redshift 3 Benchmark - Ages of Vultures (June 2021)

Considering this benchmark uses the same scene as one of our real-world tests, the fact that it seems to scale identically isn’t too surprising, but even so, it’s nice to see.

Autodesk Arnold 6

Autodesk Arnold 6 GPU Render Performance - E-Type Render (June 2021)
Autodesk Arnold 6 GPU Render Performance - Sophie Render (June 2021)

In many of our tests so far, we’ve run both CUDA and OptiX rendering to highlight the differences, so if you’ve been wondering why we don’t do that with Arnold, it’s because OptiX is default. If you have a GPU with RT acceleration capabilities, you’ll simply see improvements to performance automatically.

We’re given yet another clear-as-day example of how the GTX 1080 Ti isn’t the rendering powerhouse it once was, thanks in large part to lacking RT acceleration. That acceleration allows a low-end current-gen GPU, like the RTX 3060, to leap far ahead of the Pascal-based top-end GTX 1080 Ti. Funny enough, the RTX 3060 even manages to bring more memory to the table.

Luxion KeyShot 10

Luxion KeyShot 10 - Circuit Board Render Performance (June 2021)
Luxion KeyShot 10 - Character Render Performance (June 2021)

Like Arnold, KeyShot will automatically take advantage of RT acceleration if a GPU offers it, and also like Arnold, KeyShot highlights that it’s time to upgrade your GTX 1080 Ti.

There are a couple of odd results in both of the graphs above worth highlighting. In both projects, the RTX 3070 Ti fell behind the performance of the RTX 3070, which is yet another thing that forced us to reinstall both GPUs in order to sanity check (surprise: the results held). We can’t explain why these anomalies happen, but we’re well over being surprised when they creep up. Similarly, with the Circuit Board scene, the 3080 Ti somehow fell behind the 3080 (yes, we retested that, too.)

It could be that future KeyShot versions will fix those flip-flopped results, but as it stands today, we’d suggest the RTX 3070 over the 3070 Ti if KeyShot is your primary design tool, since it does prove faster at this current point in time. If the 3070 Ti had a bigger frame buffer, it’d be a no-brainer. But no one wants to pay more for less performance in their tool of choice. Last summer, we saw the same thing with the RTX 2070 SUPER performing the same (or better) than the RTX 2080 SUPER. Truly odd, and annoying, since it leads us to spend time retesting!

Power Consumption

To test this collection of GPUs for power and temperatures, we use both rendering and gaming workloads. On the rendering side, we run the Still Life project released alongside Blender 2.93; for gaming, we use 3DMark’s Fire Strike 4K stress-test. Both workloads are run for five minutes, with safe peak values recorded (eg: ignoring spikes that happen for a split second because Windows decides to do something). Power is recorded with a Kill-A-Watt meter, measuring full system power draw.

Workstation GPU Power Consumption - June 2021

The reason we power test both rendering and gaming workloads is probably made obvious by the big deltas seen above. In every single case (aside from 1080 Ti), gaming will draw far more power than rendering. With either metric, NVIDIA’s top-end RTX 3080 Ti and RTX 3090 prove to be the power-hungriest in our lineup, but they also happen to deliver the best performance, so it’s hard to complain.

While its performance makes the Radeon VII not as relevant today as it was at launch, we feel compelled to point out that we have no idea why its power consumption is so modest in comparison to the rest of the GPUs here. We’ve seen this same behavior in previous looks, where rendering uses far less power than gaming, although the delta between them is far more pronounced today. We ran the same GPU on the Classroom project as a sanity check, and it does use more power there, but still not as much as we’d expect (260W) for a top-end Vega. Either way, it’s just too bad that GPU doesn’t offer outstanding rendering performance given the modest power it pulls down.

Final Thoughts

By now, you should have a good idea about which GPU you’d like to go with in your new build, or upgrade to in your current build. Because of the ongoing chip shortages, and cryptocurrency miners hogging a huge chunk of the models that make it into people’s hands, it’s really hard to guarantee that you’ll even be able to find the exact model you want. The situation is even worse if you’re trying for a specific model from any one of the vendors that thrive on offering 10 versions of the same GPU.

We can’t help with the chip shortage issue, but we can wish you good luck in finding the right one for your needs, sooner than later. If you typically go the prebuilt route, you may end up having better luck than someone trying to upgrade their current rig. You may also be price-gouged less on the GPU itself, but you will have to expect a longer-than-ideal lead time.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 and AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT

That all aside, like our many performance articles of the past, this one highlighted well the fact that not all workloads are alike. If you’re a KeyShot user, for example, you can’t move into Arnold or V-Ray and expect the exact same scaling. Ultimately, though, one thing is clear: it’s hard to beat NVIDIA.

Ignoring the tests that support only NVIDIA GPUs, the tested GeForce cards prove seriously strong in the tests that AMD’s Radeons also support. That even includes AMD’s own Radeon ProRender. For Blender, weaker viewport performance on Radeon makes going with NVIDIA a no-brainer, because this is hardly the first major Blender release where we’ve seen poor Radeon performance. Add OptiX ray tracing acceleration to the mix, or even the still-better GeForce performance in EEVEE, and it’s hard to look away from NVIDIA.

It’s our hope that AMD’s RDNA3 (or whatever it’s called) GPUs bring some hefty surprises, and not just keep up to the competition better, but force certain renderer companies to begin rolling out Radeon support in Windows. We’ve heard “no comment” from select renderer developers when asked about Radeon, but we can’t help but think if NVIDIA wasn’t so dominant, we’d see greater support for the red team by now.

If you are still left with any questions, you know where to post them (↓).

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