NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4070 Ti 12GB Creator Review

ASUS TUF Gaming GeForce RTX 4070 Ti OC Edition (Thumbnail)
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by Rob Williams on January 4, 2023 in Graphics & Displays

NVIDIA’s third Ada Lovelace-based GeForce has landed: RTX 4070 Ti. This artist formerly known as RTX 4080 packs in 12GB of memory, effectively delivering a 50% boost to VRAM gen-over-gen. Our first look at the new GPU will be focusing on creator: rendering, encoding, and more.

Page 1 – NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4070 Ti: Introduction & Rendering

It’s been close to three months since NVIDIA debuted its first GeForce GPUs based around the Ada Lovelace architecture, so now seems like a great time to see a third model ushered in: GeForce RTX 4070 Ti.

To tackle the elephant in the room, calling this a “great time” to launch a third model is debatable, as the current RTX 4070 Ti is what NVIDIA planned to launch as the RTX 4080 12GB months ago. Between the original 4080 12GB and this 4070 Ti, both are equipped with 7,680 cores, 12GB of GDDR6X, and a 192-bit memory bus.

One notable change between the two planned models is that the RTX 4070 Ti has an SRP $100 lower – to settle in at $799. Despite that improved price, it’s hard to ignore another elephant in the room: the RTX 3080 launched at $699, and one generation later, we’re seeing a model lower in the ladder be priced higher.

ASUS TUF Gaming GeForce RTX 4070 Ti OC Edition

Despite its higher SRP, what matters at the end of the day is if you get what you pay for, so with a creator look at this GPU, it could be that the RTX 4070 Ti pricing seems alright. As we’ve done for the previous Ada Lovelace launches, we’re kicking off our coverage of the RTX 4070 Ti with a creator look. On this first page, we’ll be tackling rendering, while page 2 will cover encoding and other remaining tests.

While NVIDIA offers its own version of the RTX 4080 and RTX 4090, it’s letting third-party vendors handle the RTX 4070 Ti. The model we received for testing comes from ASUS, a “TUF” OC Edition with large cooler that requires two screws to secure, but will hang over a third PCI slot (in effect, making it a 2.5-slot card).

Something that stood out immediately with ASUS’ TUF edition card is that it provides an additional HDMI port on the back – for 2x HDMI and 3x DisplayPort total. The company’s ROG Strix RTX 4070 Ti also includes the same set of five connectors. As we can’t find the same from the other vendors, this is one feature that helps ASUS stand out with this launch.

Before moving on, here’s a look at NVIDIA’s current- and previous-gen GeForce lineup:

NVIDIA’s GeForce Gaming & Creator GPU Lineup
Cores Boost MHz Peak FP32 Memory Bandwidth TDP SRP
RTX 4090 16,384 2,520 82.6 TFLOPS 24GB 1 1008 GB/s 450W $1,599
RTX 4080 9,728 2,510 48.8 TFLOPS 16GB 1 717 GB/s 320W $1,199
RTX 4070 Ti 7,680 2,610 40.1 TFLOPS 12GB 1 504 GB/s 285W $799
RTX 3090 Ti 10,752 1,860 40 TFLOPS 24GB 1 1008 GB/s 450W $1,999
RTX 3090 10,496 1,700 35.6 TFLOPS 24GB 1 936 GB/s 350W $1,499
RTX 3080 Ti 10,240 1,670 34.1 TFLOPS 12GB 1 912 GB/s 350W $1,199
RTX 3080 8,704 1,710 29.7 TFLOPS 10GB 1 760 GB/s 320W $699
RTX 3070 Ti 6,144 1,770 21.7 TFLOPS 8GB 1 608 GB/s 290W $599
RTX 3070 5,888 1,730 20.4 TFLOPS 8GB 2 448 GB/s 220W $499
RTX 3060 Ti 4,864 1,670 16.2 TFLOPS 8GB 2 448 GB/s 200W $399
RTX 3060 3,584 1,780 12.7 TFLOPS 12GB 2 360 GB/s 170W $329
RTX 3050 2,560 1,780 9.0 TFLOPS 8GB 2 224 GB/s 130W $249
Notes 1 GDDR6X; 2 GDDR6
RTX 3000 = Ampere; RTX 4000 = Ada Lovelace

In the RTX 4070 Ti reviewer’s guide, the GPU is compared against the last-gen top-end RTX 3090 Ti in ray traced gaming workloads, so that gives us an easy impression of what to expect from the card in rendering. When looking at things from that perspective, the RTX 4070 Ti seems alluring. We’re talking a current-gen $800 GPU that competes against last-gen’s top-end card that cost twice as much.

While current pricing is hard to digest when we look at what’s been seen in recent years, it’s still great to see NVIDIA innovating, and continuing to push performance to “wow” levels. While Turing’s debut blew us away with its accelerated ray tracing capabilities, Ampere managed to do the same. Fast-forward to Ada Lovelace, and with the two GPUs we’ve already taken a look at, it’s the same thing. When performance doubles from one generation to the next, it’s impossible to not be impressed.

Speaking of performance, it might be a good idea to start meandering our way over to some. Following a quick look at our test machine and basic guidelines, we’ll tackle rendering performance. If you care more about encoding, photogrammetry, or viewport – hit up the next page.

Techgage Workstation Test System
Processor AMD Ryzen 9 5950X (16-core; 3.4GHz)
Motherboard ASRock X570 TAICHI (EFI: P5.00 10/19/2022)
Memory Corsair VENGEANCE (CMT64GX4M4Z3600C16) 16GB x2
Operates at DDR4-3600 16-18-18 (1.35V)
AMD Graphics AMD Radeon RX 7900 XTX (24GB; Adrenalin 22.12.1)
AMD Radeon RX 7900 XT (20GB; Adrenalin 22.12.1)
AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT (16GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT (16GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6800 (16GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT (12GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT (8GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6600 (8GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
AMD Radeon RX 6500 XT (4GB; Adrenalin 22.11.2)
Intel Graphics Intel Arc A770 (16GB; Arc 31.0.101.3959)
Intel Arc A750 (8GB; Arc 31.0.101.3959)
Intel Arc A380 (6GB; Arc 31.0.101.3959)
NVIDIA Graphics NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4090 (24GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4080 (16GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4070 Ti (12GB; GeForce 527.62)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 (24GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti (12GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 (10GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti (8GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 (8GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti (8GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 (12GB; GeForce 527.56)
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050 (8GB; GeForce 527.56)
Audio Onboard
Storage AMD OS: Samsung 500GB Enterprise SSD (SATA)
Intel OS: Samsung 500GB Enterprise SSD (SATA)
NVIDIA OS: Samsung 500GB Enterprise SSD (SATA)
Shared: Corsair MP600 1TB (Premiere Pro Export)
Power Supply Corsair RM850X
Chassis Fractal Design Define C Mid-Tower
Cooling AMD Wraith Prism Air Cooler
Et cetera Windows 11 Pro build 22621 (22H2)
AMD chipset driver 4.11.15.342
All product links in this table are affiliated, and help support our work.

Here are some general guidelines we follow:

  • Disruptive services are disabled; eg: Search, Cortana, User Account Control, Defender, etc.
  • Overlays and / or other extras are not installed with the graphics driver.
  • Vsync is disabled at the driver level.
  • OSes are never transplanted from one machine to another.
  • We validate system configurations before kicking off any test run.
  • Testing doesn’t begin until the PC is idle (keeps a steady minimum wattage).
  • All tests are repeated until there is a high degree of confidence in the results.

Autodesk Arnold

Autodesk Arnold - GPU Rendering Performance (E-Type)
Autodesk Arnold - GPU Rendering Performance (Sophie)

We’re kicking off our (alphabetically listed) rendering tests with Autodesk’s Arnold, a render engine that currently supports CPUs and NVIDIA GPUs. And, from the get-go, we see performance scaling that closely matches what we expected. While we don’t have the RTX 3090 Ti that NVIDIA itself compared the 4070 Ti to, we can see that the new card easily beats out the RTX 3090.

Blender

Blender - Cycles GPU Rendering Performance (Scanlands)
Blender - Cycles GPU Rendering Performance (White Lands)

For those interested in detailed Blender 3.4 performance, be sure to check out our deep-dive posted this week. We’re focusing on just a few rendering tests here, but that article adds more, and includes viewport results using the Solid, Wireframe, and Material Preview modes.

Once again, the RTX 4070 Ti surpasses the rendering performance of the last-gen RTX 3090, which is great to see considering the RTX 3090 originally retailed for almost twice the SRP ($1,499). It’s clear that NVIDIA’s OptiX dominates Cycles, but Eevee proves more neutral across-the-board:

Blender - Eevee GPU Rendering Performance (Red Autumn Forest)

As we stated in our AMD Radeon RX 7900-series creator look, we were hoping for a bit more performance out of the latest RDNA architecture in Blender, but to AMD’s benefit, the company’s GPUs do handle Eevee rendering operations well. Intel, on the other hand, is in desperate need of driver polish to see its Eevee performance improve.

Chaos V-Ray

Chaos V-Ray - GPU Rendering Performance (Kitchen)
Chaos V-Ray - GPU Rendering Performance (Loft Bedroom)

With V-Ray, we’re continuing to see more of the same scaling, with the RTX 4070 Ti safely slotting in between the RTX 4080 and RTX 3090.

Luxion KeyShot

Luxion KeyShot - GPU Rendering Performance (Character)
Luxion KeyShot - GPU Rendering Performance (Circuit Board)

With KeyShot, we see another example of how some projects see notable benefits with specific GPUs. In the Character test, scaling is completely expected across-the-board, whereas with Circuit Board, the last-gen RTX 3090 manages to sit ahead of the RTX 4070 Ti – albeit in the most modest of ways. A result like this could imply that the higher memory bandwidth of the RTX 3090 helped it out here; alternatively, the weaker 192-bit bus of the RTX 4070 Ti held it back.

LuxMark

LuxMark - GPU Rendering Score (Food)
LuxMark - GPU Rendering Score (Hall Bench)

In both of these LuxMark tests, the RTX 4070 Ti places just ahead of the RTX 3090. In the Hall Bench scene, which AMD has been oddly great at over the years, the RX 7900 XTX inches ahead of the RTX 4070 Ti. Now imagine if LuxCoreRender could take advantage of NVIDIA’s OptiX ray tracing acceleration (like every other render engine on this page does) – we might see some ridiculous scaling at the top-end, considering both the RTX 4080 and RTX 4090 already dominate the top.

Maxon Redshift

Maxon Redshift - GPU Rendering Performance (Car)
Maxon Redshift - GPU Rendering Performance (Cyberpunk)

To help wrap this first page up, Maxon’s Redshift delivers a similar picture as KeyShot, where the first project shows expected scaling, while the more complex scene in Cyberpunk lets the RTX 3090 scoot a little bit ahead.

With all of that rendering goodness covered, we’re going to tackle other creative performance angles on the next (and final) page, with encoding, photogrammetry, viewport, and synthetic tests.

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Rob Williams

Rob founded Techgage in 2005 to be an 'Advocate of the consumer', focusing on fair reviews and keeping people apprised of news in the tech world. Catering to both enthusiasts and businesses alike; from desktop gaming to professional workstations, and all the supporting software.

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